Toward Reducing Risk for Eating Disorders and Obesity in Latina College Women

Authors

  • Debra L. Franko,

    1. Department of Counseling and Applied Educational Psychology, Northeastern University, Boston
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  • Amy Jenkins,

    1. Department of Counseling and Applied Educational Psychology, Northeastern University, Boston
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  • Rachel F. Rodgers

    1. Department of Counseling and Applied Educational Psychology, Northeastern University, Boston, and Centre d'Etudes et de Recherches en Psychopathologie, Recherche Université Toulouse II le Mirail, Toulouse, France. This research was funded by an ENHANCE award to Debra L. Franko provided by the Office of the Provost, Northeastern University, Boston.
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concerning this article should be addressed to Debra L. Franko, Department of Counseling and Applied Educational Psychology, Northeastern University, 404 INV, 360 Huntington Avenue, Boston, MA 02115 (e-mail: d.franko@neu.edu).

Abstract

The efficacy of 2 computer-based programs was tested with Latina college women (N= 64). Compared with participants in the control group, intervention participants improved their motivation to eat fruits and vegetables (F&V; p= .042) and to participate in physical activity (p= .023) and significantly increased their F&V intake (pre- to posttest, p < .001; pre-follow-up, p= .002). Body dissatisfaction improved at a trend level (p= .055). Some modest effects of computer-based programs were found.

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