Conditioned Networking: Swiss–EU Relations in Transport

Authors

  • Dirk Lehmkuhl,

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    1. University of St. Gallen
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    • Dirk Lehmkuhl is Professor of European Politics at the University of St. Gallen, Switzerland. Previous places of his academic working include the Universities of Constance and Bielefeld in Germany, the European University in Florence, Italy, the Max Planck Institute for the Research of Collective Goods in Bonn, Germany, and the University of Zurich, Switzerland. His teaching and research portfolio include themes on European integration and International Relations, including comparative regional integration, the contribution of non-state actors to global governance and the legalisation of transnational relations

  • Olivier Siegrist

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    1. University of St. Gallen
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    • Olivier Siegrist holds a master's degree in European Political and Administrative Studies and has worked as an academic assistant at theInstitut of Political Science, University of St. Gallen. His main research interests include Swiss-EU relationships in all their aspects and environmental and transport issues


Chair European Politics, University of St. Gallen, Bodanstrasse 8, CH-9000 St. Gallen, Switzerland. Phone: +41 (0)71 224 39 85; Email: dirk.lehmkuhl@unisg.ch.

57, Rue de Vermont, CH-1202 Geneva, Switzerland. Phone: +41 (0)79 680 80 93; Email: oliver.siegrist@gmail.com.

Abstract

This article addresses the structural characteristics of the interactions between Switzerland and the EU in the transport sector, i.e. transport by air and land. More precisely, it is focused on two different aspects of this relationship: first the modes of coordination between Switzerland and the EU according to the concept of external governance and, second, those conditions that make inclusive patterns of interaction more likely. The central finding of this case study is an expansion of both the regulatory and organisational boundary in both cases. This shift finds expression in the incorporation of Swiss actors into a variety of networks that, at least in some cases, allow Swiss actors to shape EU policy making. The actual patterns of interaction are influenced by a number of factors, including the type of governance inside the EU that facilitates the inclusion of third parties in EU external governance and the problem structure that is characterized by coordination rather than enforcement problems.

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