Indacaterol: A Novel Long-Acting β2-Agonist

Authors

  • Shaunta' M. Ray Pharm.D.,

    Corresponding author
    1. Department of Family Medicine, University of Tennessee Graduate School of Medicine, Knoxville, Tennessee
    • Department of Clinical Pharmacy, University of Tennessee College of Pharmacy, Knoxville, Tennessee
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  • James C. McMillen Pharm.D.,

    1. Department of Pharmacy, University of Tennessee Medical Center, Knoxville, Tennessee
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  • Sarah A. Treadway Pharm.D.,

    1. Department of Pharmacy Practice, Auburn University Harrison School of Pharmacy, Mobile, Alabama
    2. Department of Family Medicine, University of South Alabama, Mobile, Alabama
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  • Robert S. Helmer Pharm.D.,

    1. Department of Clinical Pharmacy, University of Tennessee College of Pharmacy, Knoxville, Tennessee
    2. Department of Pharmacy, University of Tennessee Medical Center, Knoxville, Tennessee
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  • Andrea S. Franks Pharm.D.

    1. Department of Clinical Pharmacy, University of Tennessee College of Pharmacy, Knoxville, Tennessee
    2. Department of Family Medicine, University of Tennessee Graduate School of Medicine, Knoxville, Tennessee
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For reprints, visit https://caesar.sheridan.com/reprints/redir.php?pub=10089&acro=PHAR. For questions or comments, contact Shaunta' M. Ray, Pharm.D., Department of Clinical Pharmacy, University of Tennessee College of Pharmacy, 1924 Alcoa Highway, Box 117, Knoxville, TN 37920; e-mail smray@uthsc.edu.

Abstract

Bronchodilator drugs are the foundation for the treatment of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease. The principal inhaled bronchodilator treatments used are β2-agonists and anticholinergics, either alone or in combination. Currently available β2-agonists are of either short duration and used multiple times/day, or of long duration, which requires twice-daily administration. Indacaterol is considered an ultra–long-acting β2-agonist and was recently approved for use in the United States. Its duration of action is approximately 24 hours, allowing for once-daily administration. Cough was the most commonly reported adverse effect with use of indacaterol. Cough usually occurred within 15 seconds of inhalation of the drug, lasted around 6 seconds, was not associated with bronchospasm, and did not cause discontinuation of the drug. Otherwise, the drug's safety profile was similar to that of other bronchodilators. Based on similar improvement in spirometric measurements compared with other bronchodilator drugs and the convenience of its once-daily dosing, indacaterol may be beneficial in the management of mild-to-moderate chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, either alone or in combination with anticholinergic drugs administered once/day.

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