School Reintegration: A Rehabilitation Goal for Spinal Cord Injured Adolescents

Authors

  • Phyllis Graham MS RN CRRN,

    Corresponding author
      261 Mack Boulevard, Detroit, MI 48201.
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    • When this article was written, Phyllis Graham and Saul Weingarden both were employed by the Rehabilitation Institute in Detroit: Graham as the coordinator of Southeastern Michigan Spinal Cord Injury System (SEMSCIS), and Weingarden as project director of SEMSCIS. Paul Murphy is a hospital and home special education teacher in the Detroit public school system, Detroit.

  • Saul Weingarden MD,

    Search for more papers by this author
    • When this article was written, Phyllis Graham and Saul Weingarden both were employed by the Rehabilitation Institute in Detroit: Graham as the coordinator of Southeastern Michigan Spinal Cord Injury System (SEMSCIS), and Weingarden as project director of SEMSCIS. Paul Murphy is a hospital and home special education teacher in the Detroit public school system, Detroit.

  • Paul Murphy M.Ed.

    Education TeacherSearch for more papers by this author
    • When this article was written, Phyllis Graham and Saul Weingarden both were employed by the Rehabilitation Institute in Detroit: Graham as the coordinator of Southeastern Michigan Spinal Cord Injury System (SEMSCIS), and Weingarden as project director of SEMSCIS. Paul Murphy is a hospital and home special education teacher in the Detroit public school system, Detroit.


261 Mack Boulevard, Detroit, MI 48201.

Abstract

This article describes how the Education for All Handicapped Children Act of 1975, Public Law 94–142, assists in achieving the rehabilitation goal of school reintegration for spinal cord injured (SCI) adolescents. It also describes how subordinate goals are achieved during the inpatient rehabilitation phase. Comments from a survey of 13 SCI adolescents who returned to school demonstrate the need to prepare SCI adolescents for the services to which they are entitled, to acquaint them with ways of resolving possible problems they may encounter, and, when they return for follow-up care, to encourage them to continue in school.

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