Bacteriuria in Intermittent Catheterization Users: The Effect of Sterile Versus Clean Reused Catheters

Authors

  • Katherine N. Moore MN RN,

    clinical nurse specialist, Corresponding authorSearch for more papers by this author
    • Katherine Moore is a clinical nurse specialist in urology at the University of Alberta Hospital in Edmonton, AB, Canada.

  • Marjorie Kelm BSc,

    senior technologist in medical microbiologySearch for more papers by this author
    • Marjorie Kelm is the senior technologist in medical microbiology at the University of Alberta in Edmonton.

  • Ollie Sinclair RN,

    Search for more papers by this author
    • Ollie Sinclair and Gisele Cadrain are employed by the Alberta Children's Hospital in Calgary, AB, Canada: Sinclair is a clinical resource nurse in the myelomeningocele clinic and Cadrain is administrative director of clinical laboratories.

  • Gisele Cadrain RT CHAC

    Search for more papers by this author
    • Ollie Sinclair and Gisele Cadrain are employed by the Alberta Children's Hospital in Calgary, AB, Canada: Sinclair is a clinical resource nurse in the myelomeningocele clinic and Cadrain is administrative director of clinical laboratories.


2D2.12, University of Alberta Hospital, Edmonton, AB, Canada T6G 0T2

Abstract

Monthly urine cultures were analyzed at the University of Alberta Department of Medical Microbiology and Infectious Diseases to determine whether single-use sterile catheters and clean technique reduced the incidence of bacterial colonization in those using long-term intermittent self-catheterization. Thirty subjects with spina bifida, ages 3 years to 16 years, entered a crossover study with random assignment to 6 months of sterile single-use catheters or clean reused catheters. Seventeen subjects were catheterized by a parent or caregiver; 13 were responsible for self-catheterization and cleaning of the catheters. Six months of descriptive data were also collected at Alberta Children's Hospital from a similar group of subjects with spina bifida who used sterile catheters only. In the crossover group, 38% of all urine cultures were positive regardless of whether sterile single-use or clean reused catheters were employed. The other group using only sterile catheters had a 36% positive culture rate. No difference in positive cultures was found between males and females or between children who catheterized themselves and children whose parents catheterized them. The authors concluded that plastic urethral catheters may be reused.

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