Diabetes Insipidus and Spinal Cord Injury: A Challenging Combination

Authors

  • Bonnie L. Closson MSN MRC RN CS CRRN,

    clinical nurse specialist, Corresponding authorSearch for more papers by this author
    • All three authors are affiliated with the Mayo Clinic and Mayo Foundation Department of Nursing in Rochester; MN: Bonnie Closson is a rehabilitation clinical nurse specialist in nursing service administration, and Lisa Beck and Margret Swift are registered nurses in rehabil-itation nursing.

  • Lisa A. Beck BSN RN CRRN,

    registered nurses in rehabilitation nursing.Search for more papers by this author
    • All three authors are affiliated with the Mayo Clinic and Mayo Foundation Department of Nursing in Rochester; MN: Bonnie Closson is a rehabilitation clinical nurse specialist in nursing service administration, and Lisa Beck and Margret Swift are registered nurses in rehabil-itation nursing.

  • Margret A. Swift BSN RN

    registered nurses in rehabilitation nursing.Search for more papers by this author
    • All three authors are affiliated with the Mayo Clinic and Mayo Foundation Department of Nursing in Rochester; MN: Bonnie Closson is a rehabilitation clinical nurse specialist in nursing service administration, and Lisa Beck and Margret Swift are registered nurses in rehabil-itation nursing.


200 First Street SW, Rochester, MN 55905

Abstract

Diabetes insipidus is a life-threatening condition in which the kidneys excrete huge quantities of diluted urine. Diabetes insipidus as a sequela of head trauma is unusual, but not rare. When it arises in conjunction with a spinal cord injury (SCI), diabetes insipidus not only is life threatening but also raises challenges for bladder retraining. This article describes the pathogenesis, diagnosis, and management of diabetes insipidus. A case study is used to demonstrate the patient course and nursing implications, with emphasis on two nursing diagnoses: fluid volume deficit and alterations in urinary elimination.

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