Telephone Follow-Up Program Evaluation: Application of Orem's Self-Care Model

Authors

  • Bonnie L. Closson MSN RN CS CRRN,

    Corresponding authorSearch for more papers by this author
    • All four authors are affiliated with the department of nursing at the Mayo Foundation, Rochester, MN. Bonnie Closson is a rehabilitation clinical nurse specialist, and Lisa Mattingly, Katherine Finne, and Judee Larson are registered nurses in rehabilitation nursing in the department of nursing.

  • Lisa J. Mattingly RN CRRN,

    Corresponding authorSearch for more papers by this author
    • All four authors are affiliated with the department of nursing at the Mayo Foundation, Rochester, MN. Bonnie Closson is a rehabilitation clinical nurse specialist, and Lisa Mattingly, Katherine Finne, and Judee Larson are registered nurses in rehabilitation nursing in the department of nursing.

  • Katherine M. Finne RN CRRN,

    Corresponding authorSearch for more papers by this author
    • All four authors are affiliated with the department of nursing at the Mayo Foundation, Rochester, MN. Bonnie Closson is a rehabilitation clinical nurse specialist, and Lisa Mattingly, Katherine Finne, and Judee Larson are registered nurses in rehabilitation nursing in the department of nursing.

  • Judee A. Larson RN

    Corresponding authorSearch for more papers by this author
    • All four authors are affiliated with the department of nursing at the Mayo Foundation, Rochester, MN. Bonnie Closson is a rehabilitation clinical nurse specialist, and Lisa Mattingly, Katherine Finne, and Judee Larson are registered nurses in rehabilitation nursing in the department of nursing.


Mayo Foundation, 200 First Street SW, Rochester, MN 55905

Abstract

The traditional model of nursing, in which patients are discharged with a follow-up medical appointment, is no longer sufficient in the current healthcare environment. Primary nurses working in a 58-bed rehabilitation unit located in a 1,700-bed tertiary care medical center implemented a follow-up telephone call program to support the patient's transition from acute rehabilitation nursing care to community living. Patients discharged to home within a five-state area were called 2 weeks and 6 weeks after discharge. Notes on the telephone conversations were entered on a data collection form and later analyzed using Orem's self-care deficit theory (Orem, 1991). A total of 144 follow-up calls were made. During the first call (n = 105), 157 problems (1.5 per call) were noted, whereas 79 (2.0 per call) were identified during the second call (n = 39). Medication, safety, and bladder problems were most often cited as concerns by patients and caregivers after discharge. The most frequently used helping interventions during both the first and the second telephone calls were guiding and supporting.

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