Comparison Study of Home Catheter Cleaning Methods

Authors

  • Melinda J. Kurtz BSN RN CRRN,

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    • Melinda Kurtz is a urology nurse clinician and Kiko Van Zundt is a rehabilitation nurse clinician at Children's Hospital of Seattle. Jane Burns is associate professor of pediatrics and associate, infectious disease, at Children's Hospital & Medical Center in Seattle.

  • Kiko Van Zandt BSN RN CRRN,

    Search for more papers by this author
    • Melinda Kurtz is a urology nurse clinician and Kiko Van Zundt is a rehabilitation nurse clinician at Children's Hospital of Seattle. Jane Burns is associate professor of pediatrics and associate, infectious disease, at Children's Hospital & Medical Center in Seattle.

  • Jane L. Burns MD

    Search for more papers by this author
    • Melinda Kurtz is a urology nurse clinician and Kiko Van Zundt is a rehabilitation nurse clinician at Children's Hospital of Seattle. Jane Burns is associate professor of pediatrics and associate, infectious disease, at Children's Hospital & Medical Center in Seattle.


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Abstract

Three methods of cleaning urinary catheters for reuse at home by clients on intermittent catheterization programs were studied. Reused catheters were collected from clients, autoclaved, and then incubated in a culture of Escherichia coli broth. Three different isolates of E. coli were used at concentrations ranging from 4.8 × 105 to 1.0 × 108 colony-forming units per milliliter. The catheters were then rinsed with tap water for 1 minute and soaked in one of three cleaning solutions for 30 minutes. The three cleaning solutions studied were 0.6% hydrogen peroxide, bleach in a 1:4 solution with tap water, and betadine in a 1:2 solution with tap water. None of the cleaned catheters showed detectable growth for 48 hours after the cleaning procedure was performed.

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