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Using Nurse Case Management to Promote Self-Efficacy in Individuals with Rheumatoid Arthritis

Authors

  • Joanne Barry BN RN,

    Corresponding authorSearch for more papers by this author
    • All of the authors are affiliated with the Atlantic Health Sciences Corporation in Saint John, NB, Canada. Joanne Barry is the unit manager of the rheumatic disease unit, Catherine McQuade is a nurse case manager-rheumatology, and Terry Livingstone is a discharge planning coordinator.

  • Catherine McQuade BN RN OCN CCRC,

    Search for more papers by this author
    • All of the authors are affiliated with the Atlantic Health Sciences Corporation in Saint John, NB, Canada. Joanne Barry is the unit manager of the rheumatic disease unit, Catherine McQuade is a nurse case manager-rheumatology, and Terry Livingstone is a discharge planning coordinator.

  • Terry Livingstone BN RN

    Search for more papers by this author
    • All of the authors are affiliated with the Atlantic Health Sciences Corporation in Saint John, NB, Canada. Joanne Barry is the unit manager of the rheumatic disease unit, Catherine McQuade is a nurse case manager-rheumatology, and Terry Livingstone is a discharge planning coordinator.


Atlantic Health Sciences Corporation, Rheumatic Disease Unit, PO Box/CP 5200, Saint John, NB, Canada E2L 4L4

Abstract

Rheumatoid arthritis is a chronic disabling illness commanding a large portion of healthcare resources. The literature indicates that the holistic management of chronic illness has demonstrated a favorable impact on the course of the disease and its outcome. In response to these reports, a nurse case manager delivery system was implemented within a tertiary care teaching hospital to coordinate an interdisciplinary treatment plan for patients with rheumatoid arthritis. The system supported the belief that although intervention is important, self-efficacy skills have an impact on patients' coping skills. Patient care incorporates inpatient and ambulatory care services, and patients are discharged after completing scheduled visits through ambulatory care services. This article describes how patients can manage their own disease if they are provided with the necessary tools. Patients can learn to trust and use their own judgment, which can lead to self-efficacy. Another study is currently under way to further evaluate this method of care delivery.

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