The Effects of a Structured Education Course on Stroke Survivors Living in the Community

Authors

  • Judi Johnson PhD RN FAAN,

    Corresponding authorSearch for more papers by this author
    • Judi Johnson is the stroke wellness director at North Rehabilitation Center, North Memorial Health Care, a division of North Memorial Medical Center, Robbinsdale, MN, and a nurse consultant with HealthQuest in Minneapolis. Valinda Pearson is a doctoral candidate at the University of Minnesota School of Nursing in Minneapolis.

  • Valinda Pearson MS RN CRRN

    Search for more papers by this author
    • Judi Johnson is the stroke wellness director at North Rehabilitation Center, North Memorial Health Care, a division of North Memorial Medical Center, Robbinsdale, MN, and a nurse consultant with HealthQuest in Minneapolis. Valinda Pearson is a doctoral candidate at the University of Minnesota School of Nursing in Minneapolis.


HealthQuest, 5005 Mulcare Drive, Minneapolis, MN 55421.

Abstract

Forty-one community dwelling stroke survivors were measured on three dependent variables—depression, hope, and ways of coping—in this quasi-experimental, repeated-measure study. The subjects were randomly assigned to a treatment group or control group. The treatment group attended a series of eight 2-hour educational classes during a 4-week period. At the end of the series of classes, the tests of depression, hope, and ways of coping were readministered to the subjects in both groups. The results of comparing the two groups favored the treatment group; they were statistically significant for depression and for hope and approached significance for coping. These study results support the use of structured education classes to facilitate the adaptation of stroke survivors who have returned to living in the community.

Ancillary