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Results of a Multidisciplinary Pain Management Program: A 6- and 12-Month Follow-up Study

Authors

  • Elin Dysvik MS RN,

    Assistant Professor, Corresponding author
      Stavanger University College, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Health Studies, University of Stavanger, N-4036 Stavanger, Norway, or via e-mail to elin.dysvik@uis.no.
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    • Elin Dysvik, MS RN, is an Assistant Professor, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Health Studies, University of Stavanger, Stavanger, Norway.

  • Gerd Karin Natvig PhD RN,

    Associate ProfessorSearch for more papers by this author
    • Gerd Karin Natvig, PhD RN, is an Associate Professor of the Department of Public Health and Primary Health Care at the University of Bergen, in Bergen, Norway.

  • Ole-Johan Eikeland,

    DirectorSearch for more papers by this author
    • Ole-Johan Eikeland is the Director of Eikeland Research and Teaching in Bergen, Norway.

  • Gunilla Brattberg MD

    ProfessorSearch for more papers by this author
    • Gunilla Brattberg, MD, is a Professor at the Division of Rehabilitation Engineering Research, Department of Design Sciences at Lund University in Sweden.


Stavanger University College, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Health Studies, University of Stavanger, N-4036 Stavanger, Norway, or via e-mail to elin.dysvik@uis.no.

Abstract

The aim of this study was to evaluate an 8-week multidisciplinary pain management program offered to patients suffering from chronic pain. The study initially included 88 participants, and 61 of the sample completed a follow-up program conducted at 6 and 12 months after the initial programs. The pain mangement program was based on a cognitive behavioral approach with active patient participation in learning new coping skills. The intervention consisted of supervised dialog, physical activity and education. The main goals were change of focus from pain and disability to resources and functional coping strategies. It was hypothesized that the positive changes gained at posttest registration after an 8-week program on coping, health-related quality of life, and pain intensity would be maintained during follow-up sessions. The results indicated that these hypotheses were mainly supported and further pain reduction, decreased emotion-focused coping, better social functioning, and overall physical and mental health gains were observed. The participants who did not complete the follow-up program did not differ from the patients who completed the program on background variables investigated. The study also supported the claim that professional nurses are competent to lead such programs and to evaluate treatment results. Clinical and research implications are discussed.

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