Taste Preference and Rating of Commercial and Natural Thickeners

Authors

  • Melissa Horwarth MA CCC-SLP,

    Speech Language PathologistSearch for more papers by this author
    • Melissa Horwarth, MA CCC-SLP, is a speech language pathologist at the Hearing Speech and Deaf Center of Greater Cincinnati, Cincinnati, OH.

  • Angel Ball PhD CCC-SLP,

    Assistant Professor And Speech Language Pathologist, Corresponding authorSearch for more papers by this author
    • Angel Ball, PhD CCC-SLP, is an assistant professor and speech language pathologist in the University of Cincinnati Department of Communication Sciences and Disorders, Cincinnati, OH.

  • Rebecca Smith MEd RD

    Assistant Professor And DietitianSearch for more papers by this author
    • Rebecca Smith, MEd RD, is an assistant professor and dietitian in the University of Cincinnati Department of Nutritional Sciences, Cincinnati, OH.


Department of Communication Sciences and Disorders, University of Cincinnati, 3202 Eden Avenue ML0379, Cincinnati, OH 45267-0379, or via e-mail to angel.ball@uc.edu

Abstract

Dysphagia can negatively affect quality of life, nutritional status, and pulmonary status of individuals. The most common intervention for dysphagia is the use of thickening agents for liquids. This group study (n = 43) investigated the taste preference, taste ratings, and ranking for nectar-thick hot and cold beverages using three types of thickeners: SimplyThic™, Thick-It®, and noncommercially prepared natural thickeners. Results demonstrated a significant difference between the taste ratings of two commercial thickeners and between one commercial and the natural thickener for the ranking of taste with hot beverages. Every participant rated at least one of the thickener beverages as having an acceptable taste for the hot chocolate and fruit juice beverages. Exploring individual preferences is critical to selecting a beverage that increases compliance to clinical recommendations.

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