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A Comparison of Stroke Risk Factors Between Men and Women with Disabilities

Authors

  • Janice L. Hinkle PhD RN CNRN,

    Assistant Professor, Corresponding authorSearch for more papers by this author
    • Janice L. Hinkle, PhD RN CNRN, was an assistant professor at Villanova University College of Nursing, Philadelphia, PA, at the time this research was conducted.

  • Rosalind Smith RN,

    Research AssistantSearch for more papers by this author
    • Rosalind Smith, RN, was a research assistant at Villanova University College of Nursing at the time this research was conducted.

  • Karen Revere

    Research AssistantSearch for more papers by this author
    • Karen Revere was a research assistant at Villanova University College of Nursing at the time this research was conducted.


Acute Stroke Programme, Nuffield Department of Clinical Medicine, Level 7, John Radcliffe Hospital, Headington, Oxford 0×3 3DU, or janice.hinkle@ndm.ox.ac.uk.

Abstract

There are many adults with disabilities currently in the United States, yet little is known about how gender differences affect stroke risk factors in this population. This article presents a descriptive study that was designed to determine whether males and females living with disabilities differ in self-reported rates of stroke risk factors. Data were collected at conferences and meetings targeted for people living with disabilities. There were 146 participants; 54% were female; and the mean age was 58 years. The primary instrument was the Stroke Risk Screening tool. Stroke risk factors that differed significantly by gender include the incidence of hypertension (48% of men versus 32% of women), current smoking (30% men versus 4% women), history of heart disease (13% men versus 1% women), daily consumption of alcohol (10% men versus 1% women), and use of illicit drugs (10% men versus 0% women). Rehabilitation nurses should focus on earlier assessment of stroke risk factors and appropriate interventions, especially with men living with disabilities.

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