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Caregiver Strain and Caregiver Burden of Primary Caregivers of Stroke Survivors with and Without Aphasia

Authors

  • Rosemarié E. Rombough MSc RN,

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    • Rosemarié E. Rombough, MSc RN, is employed at the School of Nursing, Queen's University, 92 Barrie Street, Kingston, ON, Canada, K7L3N6.

  • Ena L. Howse PhD RN,

    Associate ProfessorSearch for more papers by this author
    • Ena L. Howse, PhD RN, is associate professor, School of Nursing, Queen's University, 92 Barrie Street, Kingston, ON, Canada, K7L3N6.

  • Wally J. Bartfay PhD RN

    Associate ProfessorSearch for more papers by this author
    • Wally J. Bartfay, PhD RN, is associate professor and graduate program director, University of Ontario, Institute of Technology (UOIT), Faculty of Health Sciences, 2000 Simcoe Street North, Oshawa, ON, Canada, L1H7K4.


Abstract

Little is known about how the burden and strain of caring for stroke patients with or without aphasia affects primary caregivers. This article (a) critically examines the literature on the burden and strain of care experienced by caregivers of stroke patients and (b) examines the relationship between aphasia and caregiver burden and strain. Two literature reviews of three databases were conducted. Fourteen articles (12 quantitative articles, 1 mixed-design article, and 1 qualitative article) were found to comply with the study criteria for the first literature search. A second literature search focused on the effects of stroke survivors' aphasia on caregiving; none of the articles retrieved met the inclusion criteria. This article suggests that there is a lack of research in this area and that several key initiatives are needed, including the development of an instrument with psychometric properties appropriate for assessing the burden and strain on caregivers of stroke patients. Implications for future nursing practice and research are highlighted.

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