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Consensus-Validation Study Identifies Relevant Nursing Diagnoses, Nursing Interventions, and Health Outcomes for People with Traumatic Brain Injuries

Authors

  • Margaret Lunney PhD RN,

    Professor and Graduate Program Coordinator, Corresponding authorSearch for more papers by this author
    • Margaret Lunney, PhD RN, is a professor and graduate program coordinator at College of Staten Island, City University of New York in Staten Island, NY.

  • Maria McGuire MPA RN,

    DirectorSearch for more papers by this author
    • Maria McGuire, MPA RN, is director of Care Management at Sea View Hospital Rehabilitation Center and Home in Staten Island, NY.

  • Nancy Endozo BSN RN,

    Associate Director of NursingSearch for more papers by this author
    • Nancy Endozo, BSN RN, is associate director of Nursing at Sea View Hospital Rehabilitation Center and Home in Staten Island, NY.

  • Dorothy McIntosh-Waddy BS RN

    Head NurseSearch for more papers by this author
    • Dorothy McIntosh-Waddy, BS RN, is head nurse at Sea View Hospital Rehabilitation Center and Home in Staten Island, NY.


margaret.lunney@gmail.com

Abstract

A consensus-validation study used action research methods to identify relevant nursing diagnoses, nursing interventions, and patient outcomes for a population of adults with traumatic brain injury (TBI) in long-term care. In meetings totaling 159 hours to reach 100% consensus through group discussions, the three classifications of NANDA International's (NANDA-I's) approved nursing diagnoses, the Nursing Interventions Classification (NIC), and the Nursing Outcomes Classification (NOC) were used as the basis for three nurses experienced in working with adults with TBI to select the elements of nursing care. Among almost 200 NANDA-I nursing diagnoses, 29 were identified as relevant for comprehensive nursing care of this population. Each nursing diagnosis was associated with 3–11 of the more than 500 NIC interventions and 1–13 of more than 300 NOC outcomes. The nurses became aware of the complexity and the need for critical thinking. The findings were used to refine the facility's nursing standards of care, which were to be combined with the interdisciplinary plan of care and included in future electronic health records.

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