Writers' Award Winner: Experiences of Family Members Acting as Primary Caregivers for Patients with Traumatic Brain Injury

Authors

  • Fumiyo Ishikawa MS RN,

    Professor at the School of Health Sciences, Corresponding authorSearch for more papers by this author
    • Fumiyo Ishikawa, MS RN, is a professor at the School of Health Sciences, Tokyo University of Technology, in Nishikamata, Ota-ku, Tokyo, Japan.

  • Sumie Suzuki PhD RN,

    Professor in the Department of NursingSearch for more papers by this author
    • Sumie Suzuki, PhD RN, is a professor in the Department of Nursing at Kokkyo Medical University in Tochigi prefecture, Japan.

  • Akiko Okumiya PhD RN,

    Professor in the Department of NursingSearch for more papers by this author
    • Akiko Okumiya, PhD RN, is a professor in the Department of Nursing, Sapporo Medical University in Sapporo, Japan.

  • Yasuko Shimizu PhD RN

    ProfessorSearch for more papers by this author
    • Yasuko Shimizu, PhD RN, is a professor in the Division of Health Sciences at Osaka University in Osaka, Japan.


ishikawa@hs.teu.ac.jp

Abstract

Research on caregiving experiences of families of patients with traumatic brain injuries has been limited to studies emphasizing negative aspects of care. During this study, families caring for patients with traumatic brain injury (TBI) shared their experiences, allowing us to collect basic data about factors related to their psychosocial adjustment. Fifteen primary caregivers were interviewed using semistructured interviews, and content analysis was performed on obtained data. One thousand eighteen recording units were grouped into seven categories: (1) spending time with the patient with TBI and understanding invisible disabilities, (2) evaluating medical professionals' handling of the case, (3) devoting oneself to caring for the patient with TBI despite feeling psychological distress, (4) accepting the disability and constructing a care system, (5) seeking out and participating in specialized treatment (rehabilitation) for TBIs, (6) hoping for better understanding and creation of an appropriate response system for TBIs, and (7) making efforts to influence people around the caregiver and those in similar circumstances to promote deeper understanding of TBIs.

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