DEFINING SUPPLY CHAIN MANAGEMENT

Authors

  • John T. Mentzer,

    1. The University of Tennessee
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    • Harry J. and Vivienne R. Bruce Excellence Chair of Business in the Department of Marketing, Logistics and Transportation at the University of Tennessee. He has published five books, and more than 140 articles and papers in the Journal of Business Logistics, Journal of Marketing, Journal of Business Research, International Journal of Physical Distribution and Logistics Management, Transportation and Logistics Review, Transportation Journal, Journal of the Academy of Marketing Science, Industrial Marketing Management, Research in Marketing, Business Horizons, and other journals.

  • William DeWitt,

    1. The University of Maryland
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    • Ph.D., is a Teaching Professor in logistics, transportation, and supply chain management at the R.H. Smith School, University of Maryland, College Park. He serves on intermodal and education committees of TRB, and has published in Transportation in the New Millennium, Transportation Journal, Logistics Technology International, Defense Transportation Journal, and Business Geographics, in addition to working for more than twenty years at Burlington Northern Railroad, and also serving as vice president marketing and sales.

  • James S. Keebler,

    1. St. Cloud State University
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    • Assistant Professor of Marketing at the G.R. Herberger College of Business at St. Cloud State University. Dr. Keebler has over 25 years of practitioner experience in manufacturing, marketing, and logistics management across several industries. He is a co-author of the books, Keeping Score: Measuring the Business Value of Logistics in the Supply Chain and Supply Chain Management.

  • Soonhong Min,

    1. Georgia Southern University
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    • Assistant Professor of Logistics and Marketing at Georgia Southern University. He has published in the Journal of Retailing, International Journal of Physical Distribution and Logistics Management, International Marketing Review, and is a co-author of the book, Supply Chain Management.

  • Nancy W. Nix,

    1. Texas Christian University
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    • Director of the Center for Value Chain Management at Texas Christian University. Her primary interests are global supply chain management, creating customer value through logistics service quality, and management of the sales forecasting and operational planning process. She has extensive industry experience and has worked with multiple companies to improve the management of supply chain activities and processes. She is a co-author of the book, Supply Chain Management.

  • Carlo D. Smith,

    1. The University of San Diego
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    • Associate Professor of Marketing at the University of San Diego. His articles have appeared in the Journal of Business Logistics, Journal of Business Forecasting, Business Horizons, and the Journal of Consumer Satisfaction, Dissatisfaction and Complaining Behavior.

  • Zach G. Zacharia

    1. Texas Christian University
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    • Assistant Professor in the Department of Marketing at Texas Christian University. He has published in the Journal of Retailing, Journal of Vehicle Design, Transportation Research Record, Materials Performance, and is a co-author of the book, Supply Chain Management.


Abstract

A management construct cannot be used effectively by practitioners and researchers if a common agreement on its definition is lacking. Such is the case with the term “supply chain management”—so many definitions are used that there is little consensus on what it means. Thus, the purpose of this paper is to examine the existing research in an effort to understand the concept of “supply chain management.” Various definitions of SCM and “supply chain” are reviewed, categorized, and synthesized. Definitions of supporting constructs of SCM and a framework are then offered to establish a consistent means to conceptualize SCM. Antecedents and consequences of SCM are identified, and the boundaries of SCM in terms of business functions and organizations are proposed. A conceptual model and unified definition of SCM are then presented that indicate the nature, antecedents, and consequences of the phenomena.

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