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LINKING STRATEGY, STRUCTURE, PROCESS, AND PERFORMANCE IN INTEGRATED LOGISTICS

Authors

  • Alexandre M. Rodrigues,

    1. Michigan State University
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    • Alexandre M. Rodrigues (M.Sc. Federal University of Rio de Janeiro, Brazil) is a Doctoral Candidate in Operations Management and Logistics in the Department of Marketing and Supply Chain Management at Michigan State University. His research interests focus on modeling the impact of supply chain planning and operational initiatives on logistical performance.

  • Theodore P. Stank,

    1. University of Tennessee
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    • Theodore P. Stank (Ph.D. The University of Georgia) is John H. Dove Distinguished Professor of Logistics at The University of Tennessee. He is co-author of 21st Century Logistics: Making Supply Chain Integration a Reality, and has published numerous articles in the areas of logistics strategy, customer relevance, and internal and external integration in various journals including Business Horizons, Journal of Business Logistics, Journal of Operations Management, Management Science, Supply Chain Management Review, and Transportation Journal.

  • Daniel F. Lynch

    1. Michigan State University
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    • Daniel F. Lynch (Ph.D. The University of Arkansas) is an Assistant Professor of Marketing and Supply Chain Management at the Eli Broad College of Business at Michigan State University. His publications have appeared, or are forthcoming in the Journal of Strategic Marketing, Business Horizons, Journal of Business Logistics, Journal of International Marketing, Industrial Marketing Management, Marketing Education Review, and numerous conferences. Research interests include: e-commerce capabilities, logistics and supply chain strategy, and resource-based theories of competition.


Abstract

The current research was undertaken to present and test a framework of supply chain logistics integration that synthesizes current logistics thought with an established theory of organizational design. The framework portrays performance as an outcome of appropriate alignment between strategy, structure, and processes. The results support the contention that a firm that pursues a relational strategy, develops information and measurement structures to support relational processes, and then uses these tools to implement and execute integrated operations will experience high levels of logistical performance. In addition, the results indicate that superior logistics performance is related to simultaneous integration of internal and external operational processes.

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