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SUPPLY CHAIN CAPITAL: THE IMPACT OF STRUCTURAL AND RELATIONAL LINKAGES ON FIRM EXECUTION AND INNOVATION

Authors

  • Chad W. Autry Ph.D.,

    1. Texas Christian University
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    • Chad W. Autry (Ph.D. The University of Oklahoma) is an Assistant Professor of Supply Chain Management in the Neeley School of Business at Texas Christian University. His current research interests include the use of information technology in supply chains, and the modeling of supply chain processes using social network theories. He has several previous publications in the Journal of Business Logistics, and in other leading logistics and marketing journals.

  • Stanley E. Griffis Ph.D.

    1. Air Force Institute of Technology
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    • Stanley E. Griffis (Ph.D. The Ohio State University) is an Assistant Professor of Logistics Management in the School of Engineering and Management at the Air Force Institute of Technology in Dayton Ohio. His current research interests include social networks in supply chains, logistics performance measurement, reverse logistics, and the role of logistics in customer satisfaction and loyalty.


Abstract

Firms invest millions of dollars annually in developing their supply chains, with the broad goal of increasing their own performance. However, despite the significant resources deployed for supply chain development, the extent to which initiating, maintaining, and managing supply chain relationships contributes to firm success remains unclear. The current article provides conceptual development supporting the valuation of firm-to-firm supply chain connections from the perspective of the focal firm. Based on the social network and economics literatures, the article introduces the concept of supply chain capital, which comprises the value of both the structural configuration and relationship content of the firm's supply chain network. Following theoretical development, a non-exhaustive set of propositions are constructed illustrating multiple ways that supply chain capital can be accrued and exploited for firm-level benefit. Managerial recommendations for investment in supply chain capital are included, as are future directions for research in the area of supply chain networks.

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