AN INVESTIGATION OF THE VALUE OF CROSS-DOCKING FOR SUPPLY CHAIN MANAGEMENT

Authors

  • Michael R. Galbreth Ph.D.,

    1. University of South Carolina
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    • Michael R. Galbreth (Ph.D. Vanderbilt University) is an Assistant Professor at the Moore School of Business, University of South Carolina. He received his Ph.D. in Operations Management. His current research interests include supply chain management, remanufacturing, and Web-based technology adoption. His work has appeared or is forthcoming in Production and Operations Management, Interfaces, Journal of Management Information Systems, and Communications of the ACM.

  • James A. Hill Ph.D.,

    1. Ohio State University
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    • James A. Hill (Ph.D. The Ohio State University) is an assistant professor at The Ohio State University. He received his Ph.D. in Operations Management. Prior to receiving his Ph.D. he was a regional supplier development manager for Pepsi-Cola. His current research interests include lead time uncertainty in supply chains, the value of cross-docking in supply chains and production planning in process industries. His research has appeared in Decision Sciences, International Journal of Production Research, and Interfaces.

  • Sean Handley M.B.A.

    1. Ohio State University
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    • Sean Handley (M.B.A. The Ohio State University) is a Ph.D. student at The Ohio State University. His research interests include strategic purchasing and supply management, outsourcing, and transportation management issues in supply chains.


Abstract

Cross-docking is the practice of transferring materials from an incoming shipment directly to an outgoing shipment without storing them at the transfer point. This essentially eliminates the inventory-holding function of a warehouse and can reduce supply chain costs. We investigate the value of one type of cross-docking in a variety of supply chain environments.

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