DEVELOPING SOCIAL IDENTITY AND SOCIAL CAPITAL FOR SUPPLY CHAIN MANAGEMENT

Authors

  • Soonhong Min Ph.D.,

    1. The University of Oklahoma
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    • Soonhong Min (Ph.D. University of Tennessee) is an Assistant Professor of Marketing and Supply Chain Management at The University of Oklahoma. He has published in Journal of Business Logistics, International Journal of Physical Distribution and Logistics Management, The International Journal of Logistics Management, Journal of Retailing, Journal of Academy of Marketing Science, among others. He also co-authored the book, Supply Chain Management.

  • Stephen K. Kim Ph.D.,

    1. Iowa State University
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    • Stephen Kim (Ph.D. University of Southern California) is an Associate Professor of Marketing at Iowa State University. His current research interests include governance of marketing channels and channel structure changes. His research has appeared in Journal of Marketing, Journal of Marketing Research, International Journal of Research in Marketing, Journal of the Academy of Marketing Science, and other journals.

  • Haozhe Chen Ph.D.

    1. East Carolina University
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    • Haozhe Chen (Ph.D. The University of Oklahoma) is an Assistant Professor of Marketing and Supply Chain Management at East Carolina University. He has published in Business Horizons, Industrial Marketing Management, The International Journal of Logistics Management, and Transportation Research: Part E. His industry background includes eight years of managerial experience in international trade business.


Abstract

Competition involves not firm against firm but rather supply chain against supply chain, but few studies explain theoretically the subsistence of a supply chain as a social entity or the operating mechanisms through which firms socialize to obtain better business performance. On the bases of social identity theory and social capital theory, the authors suggest that the salience of supply chain identity accumulates social capital in a supply chain, which then facilitates supply chain management and improves business performance.

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