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THE ROLE OF LOGISTICS IN MARKET ORIENTATION

Authors

  • Brian S. Fugate,

    1. Colorado State University
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    • (Ph.D. University of Tennessee) is on the faculty in the Department of Management at Colorado State University. His research interests include the supply chain boundary spanners' roles of information processing and coordinating in the supply chain. His research has appeared in the Journal of Business Logistics, International Journal of Physical Distribution and Logistics Management, Supply Chain Management Review, and several conference proceedings. Prior to pursuing the Ph.D., Brian worked in logistics and industrial engineering at John Deere, Allied Signal, and Delta Airlines.

  • Daniel J. Flint,

    1. University of Tennessee
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    • (Ph.D. University of Tennessee) is the Proffitt's, Inc. Professor of Marketing and Associate Professor in The Department of Marketing and Logistics and Director of the Marketing Ph.D. Concentration at The University of Tennessee, Knoxville. He has a Ph.D. in marketing and logistics from the University of Tennessee. He is well published in both marketing and logistics top tier journals such as Journal of Marketing and the Journal of Business Logistics, regularly presents at global conferences, and regularly reviews manuscripts for at least a dozen journals and conferences. Dr. Flint's expertise is in customer value, as a subset of business and consumer behavior, customer value management, specifically helping firms gain deeper insights into their customers, and logistics innovation. Dr. Flint is a member of the Academy of Marketing Science, the American Marketing Association and Council of Supply Chain Management Professionals. He has worked with a wide range of industrial and consumer organizations both as a market researcher and trainer.

  • Johan T. Mentzer

    1. University of Tennessee
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    • (Ph.D. Michigan State University) is the Harry J. and Vivienne R. Bruce Excellence Chair of Business in the Department of Marketing and Logistics at the University of Tennessee. He has published 8 books and more than 190 articles and papers in the Journal of Business Logistics, Journal of Marketing, Journal of Business Research, International Journal of Physical Distribution and Logistics Management, Transportation and Logistics Review, Transportation Journal, Journal of the Academy of Marketing Science, Columbia Journal of World Business, Industrial Marketing Management, Research in Marketing, Business Horizons, and other journals. He was the 2004 recipient of the Council of Logistics Management Distinguished Service Award.


Abstract

In today's increasingly competitive environment, survival depends on two key aspects of being market-oriented - understanding the external environment and executing decisions based on that understanding. Logistics personnel are uniquely positioned to play a key role in creating and maintaining a market-oriented organization as they are progressively gaining more responsibilities in integrating cross-functional processes and implementing supply chain strategies. This paper explores how logisticians participate in market orientation behaviors and how a market-oriented logistics function impacts logistics and business performance. Based on a qualitative field research study involving in-depth interviews with seventeen logistics personnel that draws and builds upon the logistics, market orientation, knowledge management, organizational behavior, information processing, and strategic management literatures, a theoretical model of logistics market orientation and its effect on logistics and business performance is developed and propositions are presented. Findings highlight logistics' central role in generating, disseminating, reaching a shared interpretation of, and responding to market intelligence.

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