Counseling and the Internet: Asian American and Asian International College Students' Attitudes Toward Seeking Online Professional Psychological Help

Authors

  • Tai Chang,

    Corresponding author
      Department of Counseling, Research, Special Education, and Rehabilitation, 163 Hagedorn Hall, Hofstra University, Hempstead, NY 11549 (e-mail: Tai.Chang@hofstra.edu).
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    • Tai Chang, Department of Counseling, Research, Special Education, and Rehabilitation, Hofstra University

  • Robert Chang

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    • Robert Chang, Hamilton-Madison House, New York, New York. An earlier version of this article was presented August 2001 at the National Convention of the Asian American Psychological Association, San Francisco. This study was funded by a Dean's Grant from the School of Education and Allied Human Services, Hofstra University, awarded to the first author.


Department of Counseling, Research, Special Education, and Rehabilitation, 163 Hagedorn Hall, Hofstra University, Hempstead, NY 11549 (e-mail: Tai.Chang@hofstra.edu).

Abstract

This study examined Asian American and Asian international college students' attitudes toward seeking online professional psychological help as well as traditional face-to-face professional psychological help. Results suggest that students had less favorable attitudes toward seeking help online than toward seeking help by traditional face-to-face means. Implications for counseling center services for Asian American and Asian international college students are discussed.

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