Do Cultural Attitudes Matter? The Role of Cultural Orientation on Academic Self-Concept Among Black/African College Students

Authors

  • Wendi S. Williams,

    1. Department of Counseling and Psychological Services, Georgia State University.
    2. Department of Counseling and School Psychology, Long Island University–Brooklyn.
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  • Y. Barry Chung

    1. Department of Counseling and Psychological Services, Georgia State University.
    2. Counseling and Educational Psychology Department, Indiana University–Bloomington.
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concerning this article should be addressed to Wendi S. Williams, Department of Counseling and School Psychology, School of Education, Long Island University–Brooklyn, 1 University Plaza, 227 Pratt Building, Brooklyn, NY 11201 (e-mail: wendi.williams@liu.edu).

Abstract

The authors explored the relationship between academic self-concept and noncognitive variables (i.e., Africentric cultural orientation, academic class level, gender, and involvement in culturally relevant school and community activities) among Black/African college students. Results indicated that Africentric cultural orientation and academic class level were significantly related to academic self-concept. Female students had higher scores on the Academic Self-Concept Scale (Reynolds, Ramirez, Magrina, & Allen, 1980) compared with their male peers. Implications for counseling practice and future research are discussed.

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