The Rule of Opposites: A Paradigm for Counseling Native Americans

Authors

  • Michael Tlanusta Garrett,

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    • Michael Tlanusta Garrett is a doctoral candidate and Jane E. Myers is a professor of counselor education, both in the Department of Counseling and Educational Development at the University of North Carolina at Greensboro. The authors wish to thank J. T. Garrett for continuing to bridge the gap between the past, present, and future of Native American peoples by serving as a source of wisdom and inspiration.

  • Jane E. Myers

    Search for more papers by this author
    • Michael Tlanusta Garrett is a doctoral candidate and Jane E. Myers is a professor of counselor education, both in the Department of Counseling and Educational Development at the University of North Carolina at Greensboro. The authors wish to thank J. T. Garrett for continuing to bridge the gap between the past, present, and future of Native American peoples by serving as a source of wisdom and inspiration.


4383 UNCG Station, Greensboro, NC 27413.

Abstract

The Rule of Opposites offers a cultural lesson in perspective that is useful for counselors working with Native American clients. The Rule of Opposites, based on the concept of the Circle of Life, is presented as a worldview that allows individuals to move beyond their current frame of reference toward an understanding of universal truths and underlying meanings. Use of the Rule's 7 lessons helps both the counselor and the client to recognize and resolve conflict, to ask more effective questions, to seek harmony and balance in life for greater purpose and direction, and to explore personal decision making and choices.

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