The Relation of College Internships, College Performance, and Subsequent Job Opportunity

Authors

  • STEPHEN B. KNOUSE,

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      Department of Management, University of Southwestern Louisiana PO Box 43570, Lafayette, LA 70504-3570 (e-mail: sbk4151@usl.edu)
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    • Stephen B. Knouse is the Alvin and Patricia Smith Professor and Head of the Department of Management; John R. Tanner is the Marvin R. Boesch Professor in the Department of Business Systems, Analysis, and Technology; and Elizabeth W. Harris is the director of the junior division, all at the University of Southwestern Louisiana.

  • JOHN R. TANNER,

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    • Stephen B. Knouse is the Alvin and Patricia Smith Professor and Head of the Department of Management; John R. Tanner is the Marvin R. Boesch Professor in the Department of Business Systems, Analysis, and Technology; and Elizabeth W. Harris is the director of the junior division, all at the University of Southwestern Louisiana.

  • ELIZABETH W. HARRIS

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    • Stephen B. Knouse is the Alvin and Patricia Smith Professor and Head of the Department of Management; John R. Tanner is the Marvin R. Boesch Professor in the Department of Business Systems, Analysis, and Technology; and Elizabeth W. Harris is the director of the junior division, all at the University of Southwestern Louisiana.


Department of Management, University of Southwestern Louisiana PO Box 43570, Lafayette, LA 70504-3570 (e-mail: sbk4151@usl.edu)

Abstract

This study examined the relationship of business college internships to college performance and to subsequent job opportunities. Whites were more apt to have had an internship than African Americans; there was no difference by gender. Students with internships had a significantly higher overall grade point average, were somewhat younger upon graduation, and were more apt to be employed upon graduation than students without internships. Internships were thus related to both better college performance and to receiving a job offer upon graduation. Discussion centered on the role of internship in realistic job expectations and recommendations for improving internships.

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