TEACHING YOUNG ADULTS WITH DISABILITIES TO RESPOND APPROPRIATELY TO LURES FROM STRANGERS

Authors


  • This work was supported by the Behavioral Training and Research in Developmental Disabilities Training Grant (NIH/NICHD T32 HD07226), Leadership Education in Neurodevelopmental and Related Disabilities Training Grant (HRSA/MCHB T73MC00050), and the Special Education Endowment Dissertation Enhancement Award.

Address correspondence to Marisa H. Fisher, 230 Appleton Place, Peabody Box 40, Vanderbilt University, Nashville, Tennessee 37203 (e-mail: Marisa.fisher@vanderbilt.edu).

Abstract

We taught 5 adults with mild intellectual disabilities to respond appropriately to lures from strangers. Skills were taught in the classroom first and then in situ. Before training, participants did not walk away from confederate strangers who tried to lure them away. Participants demonstrated appropriate responses during classroom and in situ training, although performance during assessments was somewhat inconsistent. Appropriate responses were observed during weekly maintenance probes and at follow-up assessments for up to 3 months after training.

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