ASSESSMENT AND TREATMENT OF VOCAL STEREOTYPY ASSOCIATED WITH TELEVISION: A PILOT STUDY

Authors


  • The study was supported in part by an experimentation grant from the Office des personnes handicapées du Québec. We thank the Centre de réadaptation de l'Ouest de Montréal for their collaboration with the study as well as Cyriel L'Homme, Imène Berbiche, and Catherine Dorion for their assistance with data collection.

Address correspondence to Marc J. Lanovaz, École de Psychoéducation, Université de Montréal, C.P. 6128, succ. Centre-Ville, Montreal, Quebec, H3C 3J7 Canada (e-mail: marc.lanovaz@umontreal.ca).

Abstract

A 6-year-old boy who had been diagnosed with autism participated in a pilot study that showed that (a) television was associated with increased vocal stereotypy and (b) sitting was associated with lower levels of vocal stereotypy. Subsequently, we reduced vocal stereotypy while the television was on by reinforcing sitting on a variable-interval schedule. Results suggest that conditional percentages may be useful for the identification of alternative behaviors as part of treatments for stereotypy.

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