AN EVALUATION OF PROGRAMMED TREATMENT-INTEGRITY ERRORS DURING DISCRETE-TRIAL INSTRUCTION

Authors


  • We thank Nitasha Dickes, Tamara Perry, and Jamie Jones for their assistance with various aspects of data collection. We give a special thank you to committee members Valerie Volkert, Michael Kelley, and Cathleen Piazza for their helpful feedback on this dissertation.
  • This article is based on a dissertation submitted by the first author, under the supervision of the second and third authors, to the graduate school at the University of Nebraska Medical Center in partial fulfillment for the requirements of a PhD in Applied Behavior Analysis.

Address correspondence to Regina A. Carroll, who is now at West Virginia University, Department of Psychology, Life Sciences Room 1232, 53 Campus Drive, Morgantown, West Virginia 26506 (e-mail: racarroll@mail.wvu.edu).

Abstract

This study evaluated the effects of programmed treatment-integrity errors on skill acquisition for children with an autism spectrum disorder (ASD) during discrete-trial instruction (DTI). In Study 1, we identified common treatment-integrity errors that occur during academic instruction in schools. In Study 2, we simultaneously manipulated 3 integrity errors during DTI. In Study 3, we evaluated the effects of each of the 3 integrity errors separately on skill acquisition during DTI. Results showed that participants either demonstrated slower skill acquisition or did not acquire the target skills when instruction included treatment-integrity errors.

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