Cytotoxicity and biological effects of functional nanomaterials delivered to various cell lines

Authors

  • Meena Mahmood,

    1. University of Arkansas at Little Rock, Applied Science Department, Nanotechnology Center, Graduate Institute of Technology, Little Rock, AR 72204, USA
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  • Daniel A. Casciano,

    Corresponding author
    1. University of Arkansas at Little Rock, Applied Science Department, Nanotechnology Center, Graduate Institute of Technology, Little Rock, AR 72204, USA
    • University of Arkansas at Little Rock, Applied Science Department, Nanotechnology Center, Little Rock, AR 72204, USA
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  • Teodora Mocan,

    1. University of Medicine and Pharmacy ‘Iuliu Hatieganu’, Surgery Clinic III, Cluj-Napoca, 3400, Romania
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  • Cornel Iancu,

    1. University of Medicine and Pharmacy ‘Iuliu Hatieganu’, Surgery Clinic III, Cluj-Napoca, 3400, Romania
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  • Yang Xu,

    1. University of Arkansas at Little Rock, Applied Science Department, Nanotechnology Center, Graduate Institute of Technology, Little Rock, AR 72204, USA
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  • Lucian Mocan,

    1. University of Medicine and Pharmacy ‘Iuliu Hatieganu’, Surgery Clinic III, Cluj-Napoca, 3400, Romania
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  • Dana Todea Iancu,

    1. University of Medicine and Pharmacy ‘Iuliu Hatieganu’, Surgery Clinic III, Cluj-Napoca, 3400, Romania
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  • Enkeleda Dervishi,

    1. University of Arkansas at Little Rock, Applied Science Department, Nanotechnology Center, Graduate Institute of Technology, Little Rock, AR 72204, USA
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  • Zhongrui Li,

    1. University of Arkansas at Little Rock, Applied Science Department, Nanotechnology Center, Graduate Institute of Technology, Little Rock, AR 72204, USA
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  • Mustafa Abdalmuhsen,

    1. University of Arkansas at Little Rock, Applied Science Department, Nanotechnology Center, Graduate Institute of Technology, Little Rock, AR 72204, USA
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  • Alexandru R. Biris,

    1. National Institute for Research and Development of Isotopic and Molecular Technologies, PO Box 700, R-400293 Cluj-Napoca, Romania
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  • Nawab Ali,

    1. University of Arkansas at Little Rock, Applied Science Department, Nanotechnology Center, Graduate Institute of Technology, Little Rock, AR 72204, USA
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  • Paul Howard,

    1. National Center for Toxicology Research, Food and Drug Administration, 3900 NCTR Road, Jefferson, AR 72079, USA
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  • Alexandru S. Biris

    Corresponding author
    1. University of Medicine and Pharmacy ‘Iuliu Hatieganu’, Surgery Clinic III, Cluj-Napoca, 3400, Romania
    • University of Arkansas at Little Rock, Applied Science Department, Nanotechnology Center, Little Rock, AR 72204, USA
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Abstract

Functional nanomaterials that included gold, silver nanoparticles and single wall carbon nanotubes were delivered to two cell lines (MLO-Y4 osteocytic cells and HeLa cervical cancer cells) in various concentrations. The cells were found to uptake the nanomaterials in a relatively short time, a process that significantly affected the shape and the size of the cells. The percentage of cellular death, due to the delivery of these nanomaterials, was found to be the highest for carbon nanotubes and increased gradually with the concentration of these nanostructures. Moreover, when the nanomaterials were delivered to the cells combined with commonly used chemotherapeutic agents such as etoposide or dexamethasone, the number of the cells that died increased significantly (100–300%) as compared with the case when only the nanomaterials or the chemotherapeutic agents were delivered. The experimental results were confirmed by Caspase 3 studies, indicating a strong interaction between the nanomaterials used in this study and the protein structure of the cells, which allowed a more effective action of the apoptotic agents. These findings could be the foundation of a new class of cancer therapies that are composed of both chemotherapeutic agents and nanomaterials. Copyright © 2009 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

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