Investigating FTIR based histopathology for the diagnosis of prostate cancer

Authors

  • Matthew J. Baker,

    Corresponding author
    1. Manchester Interdisciplinary Biocentre, Centre for Instrumentation and Analytical Science, School of Chemical Engineering and Analytical Science, The University of Manchester, 131 Princess Street, Manchester, M1 7DNUK
    • Phone: +44(0)161 306 4440
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  • Ehsan Gazi,

    1. Genito Urinary Cancer Research Group, School of Cancer and Imaging Sciences Paterson Institute for Cancer Research, University of Manchester, Wilmslow Road, Manchester, M20 4BX, UK
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  • Michael D. Brown,

    1. Genito Urinary Cancer Research Group, School of Cancer and Imaging Sciences Paterson Institute for Cancer Research, University of Manchester, Wilmslow Road, Manchester, M20 4BX, UK
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  • Jonathan H. Shanks,

    1. Department of Histopathology, Christie NHS Foundation Trust, Manchester, M20 4BX, UK
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  • Noel W. Clarke,

    1. Genito Urinary Cancer Research Group, School of Cancer and Imaging Sciences Paterson Institute for Cancer Research, University of Manchester, Wilmslow Road, Manchester, M20 4BX, UK
    2. Department of Urology, Christie NHS Foundation Trust, Manchester, M20 4BX, UK
    3. Department of Urology, Salford Royal NHS Foundation Trust, Salford, M6 8HD, UK
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  • Peter Gardner

    1. Manchester Interdisciplinary Biocentre, Centre for Instrumentation and Analytical Science, School of Chemical Engineering and Analytical Science, The University of Manchester, 131 Princess Street, Manchester, M1 7DNUK
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Abstract

Prostate cancer is the most common gender specific cancer. The current gold standard for diagnosis, histopathology, is subjective and limited by variation between different pathologists. The diagnostic problems associated with the correct grading and staging of prostate cancer (CaP) has led to an interest in the development of spectroscopic based diagnostic techniques. FTIR microspectroscopy used in combination with a Principal Component Discriminant Function Analysis (PC-DFA) was applied to investigate FTIR based histopathology for the diagnosis of CaP. In this paper we report the results of a large patient study in which FTIR has been proven to grade CaP tissue specimens to a high degree of sensitivity and specificity. (© 2009 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim)

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