Optical coherence tomography and Raman spectroscopy of the ex-vivo retina

Authors

  • Julia W. Evans,

    1. Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, 7000 East Avenue, Livermore 94550, USA
    2. Vision Science and Advanced Retinal Imaging Laboratory, Department of Ophthalmology & Vision Science, University of California, Davis, Sacramento, CA 95817, USA
    3. NSF Center for Biophotonics Science and Technology, University of California, Davis, Sacramento, CA 95817, USA
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  • Robert J. Zawadzki,

    1. Vision Science and Advanced Retinal Imaging Laboratory, Department of Ophthalmology & Vision Science, University of California, Davis, Sacramento, CA 95817, USA
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  • Rui Liu,

    1. NSF Center for Biophotonics Science and Technology, University of California, Davis, Sacramento, CA 95817, USA
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  • James W. Chan,

    1. Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, 7000 East Avenue, Livermore 94550, USA
    2. NSF Center for Biophotonics Science and Technology, University of California, Davis, Sacramento, CA 95817, USA
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  • Stephen M. Lane,

    1. Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, 7000 East Avenue, Livermore 94550, USA
    2. NSF Center for Biophotonics Science and Technology, University of California, Davis, Sacramento, CA 95817, USA
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  • John S. Werner

    1. Vision Science and Advanced Retinal Imaging Laboratory, Department of Ophthalmology & Vision Science, University of California, Davis, Sacramento, CA 95817, USA
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Abstract

Imaging the structure and correlating it with the biochemical content of the retina holds promise for fundamental research and for clinical applications. Optical coherence tomography (OCT) is commonly used to image the 3D structure of the retina and while the added functionality of biochemical analysis afforded by Raman scattering could provide critical molecular signatures for clinicians and researchers, there are many technical challenges to combine these imaging modalities. We describe an OCT microscope for ex-vivo imaging combined with Raman spectroscopy capable of collecting morphological and molecular information about a sample simultaneously. We present our first results and discuss the challenges to further development of this dual-mode instrument and limitations for future in-vivo retinal imaging. (© 2009 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim)

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