Tissue viability (TiVi) imaging: temporal effects of local occlusion studies in the volar forearm

Authors

  • Paul M. McNamara,

    1. Tissue Optics and Microcirculation Imaging TOMI Facility, National Biophotonics and Imaging Platform Ireland NBIPI, Department of Physics, University of Limerick, Ireland
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  • Jim O'Doherty,

    1. Department of Medical Physics, St. Lukes Cancer centre, Royal Surrey County Hospital, Guildford GU2 7XX, UK
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  • Marie-Louise O'Connell,

    1. Tissue Optics and Microcirculation Imaging TOMI Facility, National Biophotonics and Imaging Platform Ireland NBIPI, Department of Physics, University of Limerick, Ireland
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  • Barry W. Fitzgerald,

    1. Tissue Optics and Microcirculation Imaging TOMI Facility, National Biophotonics and Imaging Platform Ireland NBIPI, Department of Physics, University of Limerick, Ireland
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  • Chris D. Anderson,

    1. Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Dermatology, Linköping University, Linköping S581 85, Sweden
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  • Gert E. Nilsson,

    1. Department of Biomedical Engineering, Linköping University, Linköping S581 85, Sweden
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  • Rani Toll,

    1. Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Dermatology, Linköping University, Linköping S581 85, Sweden
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  • Martin J. Leahy

    Corresponding author
    1. Tissue Optics and Microcirculation Imaging TOMI Facility, National Biophotonics and Imaging Platform Ireland NBIPI, Department of Physics, University of Limerick, Ireland
    • Phone: +353 (0)61 213056
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Abstract

Tissue Viability (TiVi) imaging is a promising new technology for the assessment of microcirculation in the upper human dermis. Although the technique is easily implemented and develops large amounts of observational data, its role in the clinical workplace awaits the development of standardised protocols required for routine clinical practice. The present study investigates the use of TiVi technology in a human, in vivo, localized, skin blood flow occlusion protocol. In this feasibility study, the response of the cutaneous microcirculation after provocation on the volar surface of the forearm was evaluated using a high temporal-low spatial resolution TiVi camera. 19 healthy subjects – 10 female and 9 male – were studied after a localized pressure was applied for 5 different time periods ranging from 5 to 25 seconds. Areas corresponding to 100 × 100 pixels (2.89 cm2) were monitored for 60 seconds prior to, during and after each occlusion period. Our results demonstrated the removal of blood from the local area and a hyperaemic response supporting the suitability of TiVi imaging for the generation of detailed provocation response data of relevance for the physiological function of the skin microcirculation in health and disease. (© 2010 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim)

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