Four-dimensional imaging of murine subpleural alveoli using high-speed optical coherence tomography

Authors

  • Lars Kirsten,

    Corresponding author
    1. Dresden University of Technology, Faculty of Medicine Carl Gustav Carus, Department Clinical Sensoring and Monitoring, Fetscherstraße 74, 01307 Dresden, Germany
    • Phone: +49 351 458 6133, Fax: +49 351 458 6325
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  • Maria Gaertner,

    1. Dresden University of Technology, Faculty of Medicine Carl Gustav Carus, Department Clinical Sensoring and Monitoring, Fetscherstraße 74, 01307 Dresden, Germany
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  • Christian Schnabel,

    1. Dresden University of Technology, Faculty of Medicine Carl Gustav Carus, Department Clinical Sensoring and Monitoring, Fetscherstraße 74, 01307 Dresden, Germany
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  • Sven Meissner,

    1. Dresden University of Technology, Faculty of Medicine Carl Gustav Carus, Department Clinical Sensoring and Monitoring, Fetscherstraße 74, 01307 Dresden, Germany
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  • Edmund Koch

    1. Dresden University of Technology, Faculty of Medicine Carl Gustav Carus, Department Clinical Sensoring and Monitoring, Fetscherstraße 74, 01307 Dresden, Germany
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Abstract

The investigation of lung dynamics on alveolar scale is crucial for the understanding and treatment of lung diseases, such as acute lung injury and ventilator induced lung injury, and to promote the development of protective ventilation strategies. One approach to this is the establishment of numerical simulations of lung tissue mechanics where detailed knowledge about three-dimensional alveolar structure changes during the ventilation cycle is required. We suggest four-dimensional optical coherence tomography (OCT) imaging as a promising modality for visualizing the structural dynamics of single alveoli in subpleural lung tissue with high temporal resolution using a mouse model. A high-speed OCT setup based on Fourier domain mode locked laser technology facilitated the acquisition of alveolar structures without noticeable motion artifacts at a rate of 17 three-dimensional stacks per ventilation cycle. The four-dimensional information, acquired in one single ventilation cycle, allowed calculating the volume-pressure curve and the alveolar compliance for single alveoli. (© 2013 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim)

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