Fourier transform infrared microspectroscopy reveals unique phenotypes for human embryonic and induced pluripotent stem cell lines and their progeny

Authors

  • Julie Cao,

    1. Monash Immunology and Stem Cell Laboratories, Monash University, Building 75, STRIP 1, West Ring Road, Clayton, Victoria 3800, Australia
    2. Centre for Biospectroscopy and the School of Chemistry, Monash University, Clayton, Victoria 3800, Australia
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  • Elizabeth S. Ng,

    1. Monash Immunology and Stem Cell Laboratories, Monash University, Building 75, STRIP 1, West Ring Road, Clayton, Victoria 3800, Australia
    2. Murdoch Childrens Research Institute, The Royal Children's Hospital, Parkville, Victoria, Australia, 3052
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  • Don McNaughton,

    1. Centre for Biospectroscopy and the School of Chemistry, Monash University, Clayton, Victoria 3800, Australia
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  • Edouard G. Stanley,

    1. Monash Immunology and Stem Cell Laboratories, Monash University, Building 75, STRIP 1, West Ring Road, Clayton, Victoria 3800, Australia
    2. Murdoch Childrens Research Institute, The Royal Children's Hospital, Parkville, Victoria, Australia, 3052
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  • Andrew G. Elefanty,

    1. Monash Immunology and Stem Cell Laboratories, Monash University, Building 75, STRIP 1, West Ring Road, Clayton, Victoria 3800, Australia
    2. Murdoch Childrens Research Institute, The Royal Children's Hospital, Parkville, Victoria, Australia, 3052
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  • Mark J. Tobin,

    1. Australian Synchrotron, 800 Blackburn Road, Clayton, Victoria 3168
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  • Philip Heraud

    Corresponding author
    1. Monash Immunology and Stem Cell Laboratories, Monash University, Building 75, STRIP 1, West Ring Road, Clayton, Victoria 3800, Australia
    2. Centre for Biospectroscopy and the School of Chemistry, Monash University, Clayton, Victoria 3800, Australia
    • Phone: +61 3 9905 0765

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Abstract

Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) microspectroscopy was employed to elucidate the macromolecular phenotype of human embryonic stem cells (hESCs) and human induced pluripotent stem cells (hiPSCs) and their differentiated progeny. Undifferentiated hESCs and hiPSC lines were found to be not clearly distinguishable from each other. However, although both hESC and hiPSC variants appeared to undergo similar changes during differentiation in terms of cell surface antigens, the derived cell types from all cell lines could be discriminated using FTIR spectroscopy. We foresee a possible future role for FTIR microspectroscopy as a powerful and objective investigative and quality control tool in regenerative medicine. (© 2014 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim)

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