Characterization of melt-derived 45S5 and sol-gel–derived 58S bioactive glasses

Authors

  • Pilar Sepulveda,

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    1. Department of Materials, Centre for Tissue Regeneration and Repair, Imperial College of Science, Technology and Medicine London SW7 2BP, United Kingdom
    • Department of Materials, Centre for Tissue Regeneration and Repair, Imperial College of Science, Technology and Medicine London SW7 2BP, United Kingdom
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  • Julian R. Jones,

    1. Department of Materials, Centre for Tissue Regeneration and Repair, Imperial College of Science, Technology and Medicine London SW7 2BP, United Kingdom
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  • Larry L. Hench

    1. Department of Materials, Centre for Tissue Regeneration and Repair, Imperial College of Science, Technology and Medicine London SW7 2BP, United Kingdom
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Abstract

The ability of bioactive glasses to form a bond to living bone and also to stimulate bone-cell proliferation depends on the chemical composition and on the surface texture of the glasses. In this work, the differences in physical properties between the melt-derived 45S5 and sol-gel–derived 58S Bioglass® powders of various particle-size ranges were studied. The powders were characterized for particle-size distribution by laser spectrometry, for specific surface area and porosity by nitrogen sorption analysis, and for morphological features by scanning electron microscopy. Melt-derived 45S5 powders exhibited a low-porosity texture with surface area in the range 0.15–2.7 m2/g. In contrast, the sol-gel–derived powders exhibited a highly mesoporous texture, with surface area in the range of 126.5–164.7 m2/g and a large fraction of 6–9 nm pore sizes. These differences in texture, as well as variations in chemical composition, account for significant changes in the resorption and in vivo responses. © 2001 John Wiley & Sons, Inc. J Biomed Mater Res (Appl Biomater) 58: 734–740, 2001

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