Dose-dependent behavior of bioactive glass dissolution

Authors

  • Julian R. Jones,

    Corresponding author
    1. Centre for Tissue Regeneration, Department of Materials, Imperial College of Science, Technology and Medicine, Prince Consort Road, SW7 2BP, London, United Kingdom
    • Centre for Tissue Regeneration, Department of Materials, Imperial College of Science, Technology and Medicine, Prince Consort Road, SW7 2BP, London, United Kingdom
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  • Pilar Sepulveda,

    1. Centre for Tissue Regeneration, Department of Materials, Imperial College of Science, Technology and Medicine, Prince Consort Road, SW7 2BP, London, United Kingdom
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    • Now at Instituto de Pesquisas Energéticas e Nucleares, IPEN/CNEN, Divisão de Materiais Cerâmicos, Travessa R, 400, Cidade Universitária, São Paulo-SP, 055080-900, Brazil

  • Larry L. Hench

    1. Centre for Tissue Regeneration, Department of Materials, Imperial College of Science, Technology and Medicine, Prince Consort Road, SW7 2BP, London, United Kingdom
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Abstract

The effect of glass dosage (0.001 g ml−1 to 0.015 g ml−1) on the in vitro dynamic dissolution behavior of melt-derived 45S5 and sol-gel–derived 58S bioactive glasses, in simulated body fluid (SBF) at 37 °C, was evaluated. These glasses differ significantly in texture, especially the specific surface area and porosity, as a result of differences in manufacturing route. The concentrations of elements (Si, Ca, P, and Na) leached from the glasses into the dissolution medium, from 1 to 22 h, were evaluated with the use of induced coupled plasma analysis (ICP). The reacted powders were analyzed with the use of FTIR to observe the formation of a hydroxycarbonate apatite layer on the surface. The results show that the rate of HCA formation on both gel- and melt-derived bioactive glass powders in vitro depends on the concentration of the powders in solution. This result must be taken into account when carrying out in vitro cell-culture studies to simulate conditions in vivo and in experiments using extracts of the bioactive glass powders. © 2001 John Wiley & Sons, Inc. J Biomed Mater Res (Appl Biomater) 58: 720–726, 2001

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