Adsorbed poly(ethyleneoxide)–poly(propyleneoxide) copolymers on synthetic surfaces: Spectroscopy and microscopy of polymer structures and effects on adhesion of skin-borne bacteria

Authors

  • Lorraine H. Marsh,

    1. School of Pharmacy and Biomedical Science, University of Portsmouth, White Swan Road, Portsmouth PO1 2DT, United Kingdom
    Search for more papers by this author
    • The author, or one or more of the authors, has received or will receive remuneration or other prerequisites for personal or professional use from a commercial or industrial agent in direct or indirect relationship to their authorship.

  • Mark Coke,

    1. Reckitt Benckiser Healthcare (UK) Limited, Dansom Lane, Hull, HU8 7DS, United Kingdom
    Search for more papers by this author
    • The author, or one or more of the authors, has received or will receive remuneration or other prerequisites for personal or professional use from a commercial or industrial agent in direct or indirect relationship to their authorship.

  • Peter W. Dettmar,

    1. Reckitt Benckiser Healthcare (UK) Limited, Dansom Lane, Hull, HU8 7DS, United Kingdom
    Search for more papers by this author
    • The author, or one or more of the authors, has received or will receive remuneration or other prerequisites for personal or professional use from a commercial or industrial agent in direct or indirect relationship to their authorship.

  • Richard J. Ewen,

    1. Faculty of Applied Sciences, University of the West of England, Frenchay Campus, Coldharbour Lane, Bristol BS16 1QY, United Kingdom
    Search for more papers by this author
    • The author, or one or more of the authors, has received or will receive remuneration or other prerequisites for personal or professional use from a commercial or industrial agent in direct or indirect relationship to their authorship.

  • Michael Havler,

    1. Reckitt Benckiser Healthcare (UK) Limited, Dansom Lane, Hull, HU8 7DS, United Kingdom
    Search for more papers by this author
    • The author, or one or more of the authors, has received or will receive remuneration or other prerequisites for personal or professional use from a commercial or industrial agent in direct or indirect relationship to their authorship.

  • Thomas G. Nevell,

    1. School of Pharmacy and Biomedical Science, University of Portsmouth, White Swan Road, Portsmouth PO1 2DT, United Kingdom
    Search for more papers by this author
    • The author, or one or more of the authors, has received or will receive remuneration or other prerequisites for personal or professional use from a commercial or industrial agent in direct or indirect relationship to their authorship.

  • John D. Smart,

    1. School of Pharmacy and Biomedical Science, University of Portsmouth, White Swan Road, Portsmouth PO1 2DT, United Kingdom
    Search for more papers by this author
    • The author, or one or more of the authors, has received or will receive remuneration or other prerequisites for personal or professional use from a commercial or industrial agent in direct or indirect relationship to their authorship.

  • James R. Smith,

    1. School of Pharmacy and Biomedical Science, University of Portsmouth, White Swan Road, Portsmouth PO1 2DT, United Kingdom
    Search for more papers by this author
    • The author, or one or more of the authors, has received or will receive remuneration or other prerequisites for personal or professional use from a commercial or industrial agent in direct or indirect relationship to their authorship.

  • Barry Timmins,

    1. Reckitt Benckiser Healthcare (UK) Limited, Dansom Lane, Hull, HU8 7DS, United Kingdom
    Search for more papers by this author
    • The author, or one or more of the authors, has received or will receive remuneration or other prerequisites for personal or professional use from a commercial or industrial agent in direct or indirect relationship to their authorship.

  • John Tsibouklis,

    1. School of Pharmacy and Biomedical Science, University of Portsmouth, White Swan Road, Portsmouth PO1 2DT, United Kingdom
    Search for more papers by this author
    • The author, or one or more of the authors, has received or will receive remuneration or other prerequisites for personal or professional use from a commercial or industrial agent in direct or indirect relationship to their authorship.

  • Cameron Alexander

    Corresponding author
    1. School of Pharmacy and Biomedical Science, University of Portsmouth, White Swan Road, Portsmouth PO1 2DT, United Kingdom
    • School of Pharmacy and Biomedical Science, University of Portsmouth, White Swan Road, Portsmouth PO1 2DT, United Kingdom
    Search for more papers by this author
    • The author, or one or more of the authors, has received or will receive remuneration or other prerequisites for personal or professional use from a commercial or industrial agent in direct or indirect relationship to their authorship.


Abstract

Poly(ethyleneoxide)–copoly(propyleneoxide) (PEO-PPO) polymer coatings were evaluated for their resistance to the attachment of the marker organism Serratia marcescens and the skin-borne bacteria Staphylococcus epidermidis. The copolymers were adsorbed onto poly(styrene) films—chosen as simplified physicochemical models of skin surfaces—and their surface characteristics probed by contact angle goniometry, attenuated total reflectance–Fourier transform infrared (ATR-FTIR), atomic force microscopy (AFM), and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). These functional surfaces were then presented to microbial cultures, bacterial attachment was assessed by fluorescence microscopy and AFM, and the structures of the polymer films examined again spectroscopically. Surface characterization data suggest that the adsorbed copolymer was partially retained at the surface and resisted bacterial attachment for 24 h. Quantitative evaluation of cell attachment was carried out by scintillation counting of 14C-labeled microorganisms in conjunction with plate counts. The results show that a densely packed layer of PEO-PPO copolymer can reduce attachment of skin commensals by an order of magnitude, even when the coating is applied by a simple adsorptive process. The work supports the hypothesis that adhesion of microorganisms to biological substrates can be reduced if a pretreatment with an appropriate copolymer can be effected in vivo. © 2002 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. J Biomed Mater Res 61: 641–652, 2002

Ancillary