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Water-borne, in situ crosslinked biomaterials from phase-segregated precursors

Authors

  • Brent Vernon,

    1. Department of Materials, Institute of Biomedical Engineering, Swiss Federal Institute of Technology (ETH), Moussonstr. 18, CH-8044 Zurich, Switzerland
    Current affiliation:
    1. Department of Bioengineering, Arizona State University, Tempe, Arizona
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  • Nicola Tirelli,

    Corresponding author
    1. Department of Materials, Institute of Biomedical Engineering, Swiss Federal Institute of Technology (ETH), Moussonstr. 18, CH-8044 Zurich, Switzerland
    • Department of Materials, Institute of Biomedical Engineering, Swiss Federal Institute of Technology (ETH), Moussonstr. 18, CH-8044 Zurich, Switzerland
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  • Thomas Bächi,

    1. Central Electron Microscopy Lab, University of Zurich, Zurich, Switzerland
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  • David Haldimann,

    1. Endospine AG, Cham, Switzerland
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  • Jeffrey A. Hubbell

    1. Department of Materials, Institute of Biomedical Engineering, Swiss Federal Institute of Technology (ETH), Moussonstr. 18, CH-8044 Zurich, Switzerland
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Abstract

A novel process for the preparation of water-borne biomaterials for hard tissue repair from injectable precursors is described, where the precursors form crosslinked materials in situ under physiological conditions. The precursors react by means of a Michael-type addition reaction that makes use of addition donors such as pentaerythritol tetrakis 3′-mercaptopropionate (QT) and addition acceptors such as poly(ethylene glycol) diacrylate 570 MW (PEGDA), pentaerythritol triacrylate (TA), and poly(propylene glycol) diacrylate 900 MW (PPODA). These crosslinked materials (at 75 wt% solid), prepared from water dispersions or reverse emulsions, showed ultimate strengths in compression of 1.8 ± 0.2 and 6.7 ± 0.5 MPa and ultimate deformations of 35 ± 2± and 37 ± 2%, respectively. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) shows that the morphology of the precursors templated the morphology of the final materials. The current study indicates that it is possible to obtain injectable high-modulus materials that have appropriate mechanical properties and gelation kinetics for tissue augmentation and stabilization applications such as mechanical stabilization of the intervertebral disc annulus. © 2003 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. J Biomed Mater Res 64A: 447–456, 2003

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