Micropatterned surfaces prepared using a liquid crystal projector-modified photopolymerization device and microfluidics

Authors

  • Kazuyoshi Itoga,

    1. Institute of Advanced Biomedical Engineering and Science, Tokyo Women's Medical University, CREST-JST, Kawada-cho 8-1, Shinjuku-ku, Tokyo 162-8666, Japan
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  • Masayuki Yamato,

    1. Institute of Advanced Biomedical Engineering and Science, Tokyo Women's Medical University, CREST-JST, Kawada-cho 8-1, Shinjuku-ku, Tokyo 162-8666, Japan
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  • Jun Kobayashi,

    1. Institute of Advanced Biomedical Engineering and Science, Tokyo Women's Medical University, CREST-JST, Kawada-cho 8-1, Shinjuku-ku, Tokyo 162-8666, Japan
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  • Akihiko Kikuchi,

    1. Institute of Advanced Biomedical Engineering and Science, Tokyo Women's Medical University, CREST-JST, Kawada-cho 8-1, Shinjuku-ku, Tokyo 162-8666, Japan
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  • Teruo Okano

    Corresponding author
    1. Institute of Advanced Biomedical Engineering and Science, Tokyo Women's Medical University, CREST-JST, Kawada-cho 8-1, Shinjuku-ku, Tokyo 162-8666, Japan
    • Institute of Advanced Biomedical Engineering and Science, Tokyo Women's Medical University, CREST-JST, Kawada-cho 8-1, Shinjuku-ku, Tokyo 162-8666, Japan
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Abstract

A commercial liquid crystal device projector was modified for photopolymerization using its on-board intense light source and a precision optical control circuit. This device projects reduced images generated by a typical personal computer onto the stage where photopolymerization on a surface occurs. This all-in-one device does not require expensive photomasks and external light sources. However, light scattering and diffraction through glass substrates resulted in undesired reactions in areas corresponding to masked (black) domains in mask patterns, limiting pattern resolution. To overcome this shortcoming, two-step surface patterning was developed. First, three-dimensional microstructures of crosslinked silicone elastomer were fabricated with this device and adhered onto silanized glass substrate surfaces, forming microchannels in patterns on the glass support. Then, acrylamide monomer solution containing photoreactive initiator was flowed into these micromold channels and reacted in situ. The resultant polyacrylamide layer was highly hydrophilic and repelled protein adsorption. Cell seeding on these patterns in serum-supplemented culture medium produced cells selectively adhered to different patterns: cells attached and spread only on unpolymerized silanized glass surfaces, not on the photopolymerized acrylamide surfaces. This technique should prove useful for inexpensive, rapid prototyping of surface micropatterns from polymer materials. © 2004 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. J Biomed Mater Res 69A: 391–397, 2004

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