Sol–gel bioactive glasses support both osteoblast and osteoclast formation from human bone marrow cells

Authors

  • Maria Karpov,

    1. Department of Biochemistry, School of Dental Medicine, University of Pennsylvania, 40th South Locust Street, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania 19104
    2. Department of Orthodontics, School of Dental Medicine, University of Pennsylvania, 40th South Locust Street, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania 19104
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  • Maria Laczka,

    1. Faculty of Material Science and Ceramics, University of Mining and Metallurgy, Mickiewicza Ave. 30, 30-059 Kraków, Poland
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  • Phoebe S. Leboy,

    1. Department of Biochemistry, School of Dental Medicine, University of Pennsylvania, 40th South Locust Street, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania 19104
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  • Anna M. Osyczka

    Corresponding author
    1. Department of Biochemistry, School of Dental Medicine, University of Pennsylvania, 40th South Locust Street, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania 19104
    • Department of Cytology and Histology, Faculty of Biology and Earth Sciences, Jagiellonian University, Ingardena 6, 30-060 Kraków, Poland
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Abstract

We have examined the ability of bioactive sol–gel glass ceramics to support both osteoblast and osteoclast differentiation from human bone marrow cells (HBMC). Nucleated cells from human bone marrow were cultured on tissue culture plastic and on two sol–gel coatings: A2 glass–ceramic containing 54 mol % CaO/40 mol % SiO2 and S2 glass–ceramic containing 16 mol % CaO/80 mol % SiO2. Osteoblast differentiation was followed by measuring alkaline phosphatase (ALP) activity, mRNA levels for ALP, osteopontin, RANK ligand (RANKL), and immunofluorescent co-localization of ALP and RANKL. Osteoclasts were identified by morphology and positive staining for tartrate-resistant acid phosphatase (TRAP). ALP activity and mRNA levels were similar for cells on A2 coatings and on tissue culture plastic, but mRNA levels of osteopontin and RANKL were tenfold higher on A2 than on plastic. Cultures on A2 coatings also contained multinucleated osteoclasts staining positively for TRAP. In contrast, cells cultured on S2 coatings had the characteristics of more differentiated osteoblasts as measured by higher ALP expression. However, the levels of osteopontin and RANKL mRNA on S2 glass were lower than on A2 glass and there were fewer, weakly staining TRAP-positive multinucleate cells. Thus, sol–gel glass–ceramic materials differing in CaO/SiO2 ratios can produce markedly different effects on the osteoblast and osteoclast differentiation from HBMC. © 2007 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. J Biomed Mater Res, 2008

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