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In vitro evaluation of the bioactive factors preserved in porcine small intestinal submucosa through cellular biological approaches

Authors

  • Bin Yang,

    1. Department of Urology, Affiliated Drum Tower Hospital, Nanjing University School of Medicine, Nanjing, Jiangsu 210008, People's Republic of China
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  • Liuhua Zhou,

    1. Department of Urology, Affiliated Drum Tower Hospital, Nanjing University School of Medicine, Nanjing, Jiangsu 210008, People's Republic of China
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  • Zeyu Sun,

    1. Department of Urology, Affiliated Drum Tower Hospital, Nanjing University School of Medicine, Nanjing, Jiangsu 210008, People's Republic of China
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  • Rong Yang,

    1. Department of Urology, Affiliated Drum Tower Hospital, Nanjing University School of Medicine, Nanjing, Jiangsu 210008, People's Republic of China
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  • Yun Chen,

    1. Department of Urology, Affiliated Drum Tower Hospital, Nanjing University School of Medicine, Nanjing, Jiangsu 210008, People's Republic of China
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  • Yutian Dai

    Corresponding author
    1. Department of Urology, Affiliated Drum Tower Hospital, Nanjing University School of Medicine, Nanjing, Jiangsu 210008, People's Republic of China
    • Department of Urology, Affiliated Drum Tower Hospital, Nanjing University School of Medicine, Nanjing, Jiangsu 210008, People's Republic of China
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Abstract

The objective of this study was to develop cellular biological approaches to evaluate the potential effect of bioactive factors in porcine small intestinal submucosa (SIS) on bladder regeneration and angiogenesis. For this purpose, we cultured human bladder smooth muscle cell (HBSMC) and human umbilical vein endothelial cell (HUVEC), and then used cellular biological techniques to characterize in vitro biological effect of SIS components on HBSMC and HUVEC. Our results indicated that the SIS components had stimulated the attachment, proliferation, and migration of HBSMC and HUVEC, as well as tube formation by HUVEC on Matrigel. These results implied that the SIS might have preserved a mixture of bioactive factors including cell adhesion factors, mitogenic factors, chemotactic cytokines, and angiogenic factors, and these bioactive factors would have the potential of promoting bladder regeneration and angiogenesis. In conclusion, these cellular biological approaches might be helpful and effective for evaluation of the bioactive factors preserved in porcine SIS before it is used for bladder augmentation in humans. © 2009 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. J Biomed Mater Res, 2010

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