Get access

Coaxial electrospun poly(ε-caprolactone), multiwalled carbon nanotubes, and polyacrylic acid/polyvinyl alcohol scaffold for skeletal muscle tissue engineering

Authors

  • K. D. McKeon-Fischer,

    1. Virginia Tech-Wake Forest School of Biomedical Engineering and Sciences, Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University, Blacksburg, Virginia 24061
    Search for more papers by this author
  • D. H. Flagg,

    1. Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University, Blacksburg, Virginia 24061
    Search for more papers by this author
  • J. W. Freeman

    Corresponding author
    1. Virginia Tech-Wake Forest School of Biomedical Engineering and Sciences, Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University, Blacksburg, Virginia 24061
    • Virginia Tech-Wake Forrest School of Biomedical Engineering and Sciences, Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University, Blacksburg, Virginia 24061
    Search for more papers by this author

  • McKeon-Fischer KD, Flagg DH, Freeman JW. 2011. Coaxial electrospun poly(e-caprolactone), multiwalled carbon nanotubes, and polyacrylic acid/polyvinyl alcohol scaffold for skeletal muscle tissue engineering. J Biomed Mater Res Part A 2011:99A:493–499.

Abstract

Skeletal muscle repair after injury usually results in scar tissue and decreased functionality. In this study, we coaxially electrospun poly(ε-caprolactone), multiwalled carbon nanotubes, and a hydrogel consisting of polyvinyl alcohol and polyacrylic acid (PCL-MWCNT-H) to create a self-contained nanoactuating scaffold for skeletal muscle tissue replacement. This was then compared to electrospun PCL and PCL-MWCNT scaffolds. All scaffolds displayed some conductivity; however, MWCNT incorporation increased the conductivity. Only the PCL-MWCNT-H actuated when stimulated with 15 and 20 V. The PCL, PCL-MWCNT, and hydrogel only scaffolds demonstrated no reaction when 5, 8, 10, 15, and 20 V were applied. Thus, all components of the PCL-MWCNT-H scaffold are essential for movement. All three PCL-containing scaffolds were biocompatible, but the PCL-MWCNT-H scaffolds displayed more multinucleated cells with actin interaction. After tensile testing, the MWCNT-containing scaffolds had higher strength than the rat and pig skeletal muscle. Although the mechanical properties were higher than muscle, the PCL-MWCNT-H scaffold shows promise as a potential bioartificial nanoactuator for skeletal muscle. © 2011 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. J Biomed Mater Res Part A:, 2011.

Ancillary