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Magnetic field-induced acceleration of the accumulation of magnetic iron oxide nanoparticles by cultured brain astrocytes

Authors

  • Marie-Christin Lamkowsky,

    1. Centre for Biomolecular Interactions Bremen, University of Bremen, Bremen, Germany
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  • Mark Geppert,

    1. Centre for Biomolecular Interactions Bremen, University of Bremen, Bremen, Germany
    2. Centre for Environmental Research and Sustainable Technology, University of Bremen, Bremen, Germany
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  • Maike M. Schmidt,

    1. Centre for Biomolecular Interactions Bremen, University of Bremen, Bremen, Germany
    2. Centre for Environmental Research and Sustainable Technology, University of Bremen, Bremen, Germany
    3. Advanced Ceramics, University of Bremen, Germany
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  • Ralf Dringen

    Corresponding author
    1. Centre for Biomolecular Interactions Bremen, University of Bremen, Bremen, Germany
    2. Centre for Environmental Research and Sustainable Technology, University of Bremen, Bremen, Germany
    3. School of Psychology and Psychiatry, Monash University, Clayton, Australia
    • Centre for Biomolecular Interactions Bremen, University of Bremen, Bremen, Germany
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  • How to cite this article: Lamkowsky M-C, Geppert M, Schmidt MM, Dringen R. 2012. Magnetic field-induced acceleration of the accumulation of magnetic iron oxide nanoparticles by cultured brain astrocytes. J Biomed Mater Res Part A 2012:100A:323–334.

Abstract

Magnetic iron oxide nanoparticles (Fe-NPs) are considered for various biomedical and neurobiological applications that involve the presence of external magnetic fields. However, little is known on the effects of a magnetic field on the uptake of such particles by brain cells. Cultured brain astrocytes accumulated dimercaptosuccinate-coated Fe-NP in a time-, temperature-, and concentration-dependent manner. This accumulation was strongly enhanced by the presence of the magnetic field generated by a permanent neodymium iron boron magnet that had been positioned below the cells. The magnetic field-induced acceleration of the accumulation of Fe-NP increased almost proportional to the strength of the magnetic field applied, increasing the cellular-specific iron content from an initial 10 nmol/mg protein within 4 h of incubation at 37°C to up to 12,000 nmol/mg protein. However, presence of a magnetic field also increased the amounts of iron that attached to the cells during incubation with Fe-NP at 4°C. These results suggest that the presence of an external magnetic field promotes in cultured astrocytes both the binding of Fe-NP to the cell membrane and the internalization of Fe-NP. © 2011 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. J Biomed Mater Res Part A, 2012.

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