Interplay between grain structure and protein adsorption on functional response of osteoblasts: Ultrafine-grained versus coarse-grained substrates

Authors

  • R. D. K. Misra,

    Corresponding author
    1. Biomaterials and Biomedical Engineering Research Laboratory, Center for Structural and Functional Materials, University of Louisiana at Lafayette, P.O. Box 44130, Lafayette, Louisiana 70504
    • Biomaterials and Biomedical Engineering Research Laboratory, Center for Structural and Functional Materials, University of Louisiana at Lafayette, P.O. Box 44130, Lafayette, Louisiana 70504
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  • C. Nune,

    1. Biomaterials and Biomedical Engineering Research Laboratory, Center for Structural and Functional Materials, University of Louisiana at Lafayette, P.O. Box 44130, Lafayette, Louisiana 70504
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  • T. C. Pesacreta,

    1. Biology Department and Microscopy Center, University of Louisiana at Lafayette, P.O. Box 44130, Lafayette, Louisiana 70504
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  • M. C. Somani,

    1. Department of Mechanical Engineering, University of Oulu, P.O. Box 4200, 90014 Oulu, Finland
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  • L. P. Karjalainen

    1. Department of Mechanical Engineering, University of Oulu, P.O. Box 4200, 90014 Oulu, Finland
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  • How to cite this article: Misra RDK, Nune C, Pesacreta TC, Somani MC, Karjalainen LP. 2013. Interplay between grain structure and protein adsorption on functional response of osteoblasts: Ultrafine-grained versus coarse-grained substrates. J Biomed Mater Res Part A 2013:101A:1–12.

  • This article was published online on 8 May 2012. An error was subsequently identified. This notice is included in the online and print versions to indicate that both have been corrected on 22 October 2012.

Abstract

The rapid adsorption of proteins is the starting and primary biological response that occurs when a biomedical device is implanted in the physiological system. The biological response, however, depends on the surface characteristics of the device. Considering the significant interest in nano-/ultrafine surfaces and nanostructured coatings, we describe here, the interplay between grain structure and protein adsorption (bovine serum albumin: BSA) on osteoblasts functions by comparing nanograined/ultrafine-grained (NG/UFG) and coarse-grained (CG: grain size in the micrometer range) substrates by investigating cell–substrate interactions. The protein adsorption on NG/UFG surface was beneficial in favorably modulating biological functions including cell attachment, proliferation, and viability, whereas the effect was less pronounced on protein adsorbed CG surface. Additionally, immunofluorescence studies demonstrated stronger vinculin signals associated with actin stress fibers in the outer regions of the cells and cellular extensions on protein adsorbed NG/UFG surface. The functional response followed the sequence: NG/UFGBSA > NG/UFG > CGBSA > CG. The differences in the cellular response on bare and protein adsorbed NG/UFG and CG surfaces are attributed to cumulative contribution of grain structure and degree of hydrophilicity. The study underscores the potential advantages of protein adsorption on artificial biomedical devices to enhance the bioactivity and regulate biological functions. © 2012 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. J Biomed Mater Res Part A: 101A:1–12, 2013.

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