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Bioactive anti-inflammatory coating for chronic neural electrodes

Authors

  • Aryeh H. Taub,

    Corresponding author
    1. Psychobiology Research Unit, Department of Psychology, Tel-Aviv University, Tel-Aviv 69978, Israel
    Current affiliation:
    1. Department of Neurobiology, Weizmann Institute of Science, Rehovot 76100, Israel
    • Psychobiology Research Unit, Department of Psychology, Tel-Aviv University, Tel-Aviv 69978, Israel
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    • A.H.T. conceived the hypothesis; A.H.T., M.M., and Y.S.-D. designed the experiments; A.H.T. produced the biocoated electrodes; A.H.T., R.H., and A.M. performed the electrode implantation; A.H.T performed the data analyses and wrote the manuscript; and all the authors participated in editing and finalizing the manuscript.

  • Roni Hogri,

    1. Psychobiology Research Unit, Department of Psychology, Tel-Aviv University, Tel-Aviv 69978, Israel
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    • A.H.T. conceived the hypothesis; A.H.T., M.M., and Y.S.-D. designed the experiments; A.H.T. produced the biocoated electrodes; A.H.T., R.H., and A.M. performed the electrode implantation; A.H.T performed the data analyses and wrote the manuscript; and all the authors participated in editing and finalizing the manuscript.

  • Ari Magal,

    1. Psychobiology Research Unit, Department of Psychology, Tel-Aviv University, Tel-Aviv 69978, Israel
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    • A.H.T. conceived the hypothesis; A.H.T., M.M., and Y.S.-D. designed the experiments; A.H.T. produced the biocoated electrodes; A.H.T., R.H., and A.M. performed the electrode implantation; A.H.T performed the data analyses and wrote the manuscript; and all the authors participated in editing and finalizing the manuscript.

  • Matti Mintz,

    1. Psychobiology Research Unit, Department of Psychology, Tel-Aviv University, Tel-Aviv 69978, Israel
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    • A.H.T. conceived the hypothesis; A.H.T., M.M., and Y.S.-D. designed the experiments; A.H.T. produced the biocoated electrodes; A.H.T., R.H., and A.M. performed the electrode implantation; A.H.T performed the data analyses and wrote the manuscript; and all the authors participated in editing and finalizing the manuscript.

  • Yosi Shacham-Diamand

    1. Department of Electrical Engineering, School of Electrical Engineering-Physical Electronics, Tel Aviv University, Tel-Aviv 69978, Israel
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    • A.H.T. conceived the hypothesis; A.H.T., M.M., and Y.S.-D. designed the experiments; A.H.T. produced the biocoated electrodes; A.H.T., R.H., and A.M. performed the electrode implantation; A.H.T performed the data analyses and wrote the manuscript; and all the authors participated in editing and finalizing the manuscript.

Errata

This article is corrected by:

  1. Errata: Bioactive anti-inflammatory coating for chronic neural electrodes Volume 102, Issue 1, 304, Article first published online: 28 October 2013

  • How to cite this article: Taub AH, Hogri R, Magal A, Mintz M, Shacham-Diamand Y. 2012. Bioactive anti-inflammatory coating for chronic neural electrodes. J Biomed Mater Res Part A 2012:100A:1854–1858.

Abstract

Chronic electrodes are widely used for brain degenerative and psychiatric daises such as Parkinson's diseases, major depression, and obsessive-compulsive disorder, and for neuronal prosthesis. Brain immune reaction to electrodes in the form of glial scar encapsulates the electrode and reduces the efficacy of deep brain stimulation and neuronal prosthesis. State-of-the-art strategies for improving brain–electrode interface use passive protein coating to “camouflage” the electrode from the immune system. In this study, we actively reduced the brain immune reaction to the chronic electrodes using immune suppressing protein, that is, interleukin (IL)-1 receptor antagonist. IL-1 receptor antagonist-coated electrodes and noncoated electrodes were chronically implanted in rats. An additional group of rats was chronically implanted with IL-1 receptor antagonist- and laminin-coated electrodes (as passive protein). Examination of glial scaring 1ne and 4 weeks after implantation indicated a significant reduction in the amount of glial scar in the vicinity of the IL-1 receptor antagonist-coated electrode in comparison to both noncoated electrode and laminin-coated electrodes. The results strongly suggest that active immune suppressing protein reduces the level of immune reaction to chronic electrodes already after 1 week after implantation and generates less immune reaction then passive protein coating. © 2012 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. J Biomed Mater Res Part A, 2012.

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