Cytokine secretion from human peripheral blood mononuclear cells cultured in vitro with metal particles

Authors


  • How to cite this article: Cachinho SCP, Pu F, Hunt JA. 2013. Cytokine secretion from human peripheral blood mononuclear cells cultured in vitro with metal particles. J Biomed Mater Res Part A 2013:101A:1201–1209.

Abstract

The failure of implanted medical devices can be associated with changes in the production of cytokines by cells of the immune system. Cytokines released by peripheral blood mononuclear cells upon contact with metal particles were quantified to understand their role in implantation intergration and their importance as messengers in the recruitment of T-lymphocytes at the implantation site. Opsonization was utilised to understand the influence of serum proteins on particle-induced cytokine production and release. Different metal compositions were used in the particulate format, Titanium (Ti), Titanium alloy (Ti6Al4V), and Stainless Steel 316L (SS), and were cultured in vitro with a mixed population of monocytes/macrophages and lymphocytes. The cells were also exposed to an exogenous stimulant mixture of phytohemagglutinin-P and interferon-gamma (IFN-γ) and opsonized particles with human serum. Interleukins, IL-1α, IL-1β, IL-2, IL-4, IL-6, IL-8, IFN-γ, and tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-α) were investigated using enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay as they are an indicator of the inflammation evoked by particulate metals. It has been experimentally evidenced that metal particles induced higher amounts of IL-6 and IL-1 but very low amounts of TNF-α. T-lymphocyte activation was evaluated by the quantification of IL-2 and IFN-γ levels. The results showed that nonopsonized and opsonized metal particles did not induce the release of increased levels of IL-2 and IFN-γ. © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. J Biomed Mater Res Part A, 2013.

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