Cell–material interactions on biphasic polyurethane matrix

Authors

  • Patrick Dicesare,

    1. Department of Chemical and Biological Engineering, University at Buffalo, The State University of New York, Buffalo, New York 14260
    Current affiliation:
    1. *Present address: Anheuser-Busch Co, Houston, TX
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  • Wade M. Fox,

    1. Department of Biomedical Engineering, University at Buffalo, The State University of New York, Buffalo, New York 14260
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  • Michael J. Hill,

    1. Department of Biomedical Engineering, University at Buffalo, The State University of New York, Buffalo, New York 14260
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  • G. Rajesh Krishnan,

    1. Department of Biomedical Engineering, University at Buffalo, The State University of New York, Buffalo, New York 14260
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  • Shuying Yang,

    1. Department of Oral Biology, School of Dental Medicine, University at Buffalo, The State University of New York, Buffalo, New York 14214
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  • Debanjan Sarkar

    Corresponding author
    1. Department of Chemical and Biological Engineering, University at Buffalo, The State University of New York, Buffalo, New York 14260
    2. Department of Biomedical Engineering, University at Buffalo, The State University of New York, Buffalo, New York 14260
    • Department of Chemical and Biological Engineering, University at Buffalo, The State University of New York, Buffalo, New York 14260
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  • How to cite this article: Dicesare P, Fox WM, Hill MJ, Krishnan GR, Yang S, Sarkar D. 2013. Cell–material interactions on biphasic polyurethane matrix. J Biomed Mater Res Part A 2013:101A:2151–2163.

Abstract

Cell–matrix interaction is a key regulator for controlling stem cell fate in regenerative tissue engineering. These interactions are induced and controlled by the nanoscale features of extracellular matrix and are mimicked on synthetic matrices to control cell structure and functions. Recent studies have shown that nanostructured matrices can modulate stem cell behavior and exert specific role in tissue regeneration. In this study, we have demonstrated that nanostructured phase morphology of synthetic matrix can control adhesion, proliferation, organization and migration of human mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs). Nanostructured biodegradable polyurethanes (PU) with segmental composition exhibit biphasic morphology at nanoscale dimensions and can control cellular features of MSCs. Biodegradable PU with polyester soft segment and hard segment composed of aliphatic diisocyanates and dipeptide chain extender were designed to examine the effect polyurethane phase morphology. By altering the polyurethane composition, morphological architecture of PU was modulated and its effect was examined on MSC. Results show that MSCs can sense the nanoscale morphology of biphasic polyurethane matrix to exhibit distinct cellular features and, thus, signifies the relevance of matrix phase morphology. The role of nanostructured phases of a synthetic matrix in controlling cell–matrix interaction provides important insights for regulation of cell behavior on synthetic matrix and, therefore, is an important tool for engineering tissue regeneration. © 2012 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. J Biomed Mater Res Part A, 2013.

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