A new implant with solid core and porous surface: The biocompatability with bone

Authors

  • Xu Yang,

    1. Key Laboratory for Oral Biomedical Engineering of Ministry of Education, School and Hospital of Stomatology, Wuhan University, Wuhan, People's Republic of China
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  • Dihua Wang,

    1. Department of Environmental Engineering, School of Resource and Environmental Science, Wuhan University, Wuhan, People's Republic of China
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  • Youde Liang,

    1. Key Laboratory for Oral Biomedical Engineering of Ministry of Education, School and Hospital of Stomatology, Wuhan University, Wuhan, People's Republic of China
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  • Huayi Yin,

    1. Department of Environmental Engineering, School of Resource and Environmental Science, Wuhan University, Wuhan, People's Republic of China
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  • Shuang Zhang,

    1. Key Laboratory for Oral Biomedical Engineering of Ministry of Education, School and Hospital of Stomatology, Wuhan University, Wuhan, People's Republic of China
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  • Tao Jiang,

    1. Key Laboratory for Oral Biomedical Engineering of Ministry of Education, School and Hospital of Stomatology, Wuhan University, Wuhan, People's Republic of China
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  • Yining Wang,

    1. Key Laboratory for Oral Biomedical Engineering of Ministry of Education, School and Hospital of Stomatology, Wuhan University, Wuhan, People's Republic of China
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  • Yi Zhou

    1. Key Laboratory for Oral Biomedical Engineering of Ministry of Education, School and Hospital of Stomatology, Wuhan University, Wuhan, People's Republic of China
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Correspondence to: Y. Zhou; e-mail: dryizhou@163.com

Abstract

This research investigated osteogenic potencies of Farthing–Fray–Chen Titanium (FFcTi) implant with transitional porous-solid structure. The material characteristics, biomechanical property, osteogenic performances were assessed. FFcTi showed similar roughness as sand-blasted and acid etched titanium (SA), but was more hydrophilic than SA and machined commercial pure titanium (MA). Young's modulus of FFcTi implant in compressive tests was 15.8 ± 6.3 GPa, which was close to bone. In vitro observations manifested excellent spreading abilities of MC3T3-E1 cell on FFcTi and SA. Adhesion rates of MC3T3-E1 cells at 4 h gradually decreased on MA, SA, and FFcTi surfaces (MA > SA, p < 0.01; SA > FFcTi, p < 0.05), while cell proliferation ability on FFcTi was weaker than MA during 1–6 days (p < 0.01) and similar to MA and SA in day 11. ALP activity of cells on FFcTi at 14 day was higher than MA and lower than SA (p < 0.01). In a bone defect model of rabbits, BIC and bone volum ratio within 50 μm were significantly higher for FFcTi than MA (BIC, p < 0.01; BT0.05, p < 0.05) while bone volume ratio within 100 and 500 μm were of no differences. Micro CT analysis also showed similar results to the histomorphometric data. Thus, we conclude that FFcTi with melting sphere based multiporous structure has a hydrophilic, rough surface, and close modulus to bone. In vitro, its low proliferation and ALP activity promotion were similar to other micro scale roughed surface. In vivo test showed better osteogenesis ability when compared with MA at least in 2 weeks. Thus, this Farthing–Fray–Chen Titanium implant seems to hold considerable potential for bone implant applications. © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. J Biomed Mater Res Part A: 102A: 2395–2407, 2014.

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