Pannexin 3 is a novel target for Runx2, expressed by osteoblasts and mature growth plate chondrocytes

Authors

  • Stephen R Bond,

    1. Department of Cellular and Physiological Science, Life Sciences Institute, University of British Columbia, Vancouver, British Columbia, Canada
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  • Alice Lau,

    1. Department of Cellular and Physiological Science, Life Sciences Institute, University of British Columbia, Vancouver, British Columbia, Canada
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  • Silvia Penuela,

    1. Department of Anatomy and Cell Biology, University of Western Ontario, London, Ontario, Canada
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  • Arthur V Sampaio,

    1. Department of Cellular and Physiological Science, Biomedical Research Center, University of British Columbia, Vancouver, British Columbia, Canada
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  • T Michael Underhill,

    1. Department of Cellular and Physiological Science, Biomedical Research Center, University of British Columbia, Vancouver, British Columbia, Canada
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  • Dale W Laird,

    1. Department of Anatomy and Cell Biology, University of Western Ontario, London, Ontario, Canada
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  • Christian C Naus

    Corresponding author
    1. Department of Cellular and Physiological Science, Life Sciences Institute, University of British Columbia, Vancouver, British Columbia, Canada
    • Department of Cellular and Physiological Science, Life Sciences Institute, 2350 Health Science Mall, Vancouver, BC, V6T 1Z3, Canada.
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Abstract

Pannexins are a class of chordate channel proteins identified by their homology to insect gap junction proteins. The pannexin family consists of three members, Panx1, Panx2, and Panx3, and the role each of these proteins plays in cellular processes is still under investigation. Previous reports of Panx3 expression indicate enrichment in skeletal tissues, so we have further investigated this distribution by surveying the developing mouse embryo with immunofluorescence. High levels of Panx3 were detected in intramembranous craniofacial flat bones, as well as long bones of the appendicular and axial skeleton. This distribution is the result of expression in both osteoblasts and hypertrophic chondrocytes. Furthermore, the Panx3 promoter contains putative binding sites for transcription factors involved in bone formation, and we show that the sequence between bases −275 and −283 is responsive to Runx2 activation. Taken together, our data suggests that Panx3 may serve an important role in bone development, and is a novel target for Runx2-dependent signaling. © 2011 American Society for Bone and Mineral Research

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